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Bible Reflections View Comments

Our Neighbors Aren't Always Like Us
By Diane M. Houdek
Source: Bringing Home the Word
Published: Sunday, July 14, 2013
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Our summer is still marked by reminders of the Boston Marathon bombings, just three months ago. One of the side stories that emerged was the difficulty in finding a place to bury the body of Tamerlan Tsarnaev, the older brother suspected in the bombings. Martha Mullen, in Virginia, heard about the problem and contacted several Islamic funeral organizations in her area and they agreed to work with her to see that he was buried properly. They, too, had been concerned.

In an interview with NPR, Mullen said, “Jesus tells us to—in the parable of the Good Samaritan—to love your neighbor as yourself. And your neighbor is not just someone you belong with but someone who is alien to you. That was the biggest motivation, is that, you know, if I’m going to live my faith, then I’m going to do that which is uncomfortable and not necessarily what's comfortable.”

Jesus’s listeners would have considered Samaritans to be enemies and heretics. The Samaritans, for their part, would have resented the Jewish majority. They reflected an ethnic and national bias that colored their perspective and their expectations. Both sides most likely caricatured the other. For Jesus to make a Samaritan the hero of is parable was unthinkable. But he did it to make the point that to be a neighbor to others, to love our neighbors as ourselves, we need to show mercy and compassion to anyone in need.

If the Samaritan is the last person the audience would have expected to be the hero, the priest and the Levite, committed to serving God, might have been the first. Scholars have long speculated about why they passed by the beaten man without stopping to help. Generally, the conclusion is that they were on their way to the Temple and were concerned about maintaining ritual purity. Touching an injured or dying person would have kept them from their duties according to the law. This drives home the point Jesus makes again and again the Gospels: Compassion always trumps legalism. Elsewhere in the Gospels, he quotes the prophet Hosea, “It is mercy I desire, not sacrifice.”

We can say that we don’t want to reach out to the neediest among us, but we can’t say that the Gospel does not call us to do exactly that. We can list reasons why terrorist and murderers should be outside the bounds of common human decency, but we do not have the right to place them outside God’s infinite mercy. Whether we fear for our safety, our reputations, our health, or our pocketbooks, we have to live with the knowledge that in so far as we are unable to overcome that fear, we will be limited in our growth toward holiness.

For most of us, our parish communities are filled with people who look like us and talk like us and share our social and cultural values. We avoid certain parts of town, the places where “those people” live. We judge people on the news, especially if they’re not “one of us.” It can be difficult to break out of this comfort zone.

Maybe the place to begin is to make an effort not to look the other way. As we learn to see the need and the suffering around us, we will discover ways to help alleviate that suffering. Our first efforts to help may seem small and insignificant. But if we persist, we might be surprised at where the Spirit leads us.



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Hugh of Grenoble: Today’s saint could be a patron for those of us who feel so overwhelmed by all the problems in the world that we don’t know where to begin. 
<p>Hugh, who served as a bishop in France for 52 years, had his work cut out for him from the start. Corruption seemed to loom in every direction: the buying and selling of Church offices, violations of clerical celibacy, lay control of Church property, religious indifference and/or ignorance. After serving as bishop for two years, he’d had his fill. He tried disappearing to a monastery, but the pope called him back to continue the work of reform. </p><p>Ironically, Hugh was reasonably effective in the role of reformer—surely because of his devotion to the Church but also because of his strong character. In conflicts between Church and state he was an unflinching defender of the Church. He fearlessly supported the papacy. He was eloquent as a preacher. He restored his own cathedral, made civic improvements in the town and weathered a brief exile. </p><p>Hugh may be best known as patron and benefactor of St. Bruno, founder of the Carthusian Order. </p><p>Hugh died in 1132. He was canonized only two years later.</p> American Catholic Blog In our lives, Lord, you make wondrous things happen that deeply impress us; then as time passes, we forget. Father, deepen my faith in you and my trust in your love and care for me, so I may be strong when difficult times occur that will test my love and loyalty to you. I ask for this grace in Jesus's name, Amen.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Wednesday of Holy Week
Today keep in prayer all the priests and ministers throughout the world who will preside at Holy Week services.

Tuesday of Holy Week
While Lent has a penitential character, it is also a time for reflecting on the baptismal commitment we make as Christians.

Monday of Holy Week
Holy Week reminds us of the price Jesus paid for our salvation. Take time for prayer at home and at church.

Palm Sunday
Holy Week services and prayers invite us to follow Jesus into Jerusalem, experiencing the events of his passion and death.

Praying for You
As they grow closer to the Easter sacraments, your parish’s RCIA candidates count on your prayers.




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