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Minute Meditations
For the New Year Minute Meditations
Almighty God, with you there is no beginning and no end for you are the origin and goal of all creation. May this new year which we dedicate to you bring us abundant prosperity and growth in holy living.
— from The Catholic Prayer Book

Thursday, January 17, 2013
Minute Meditation for 1/16/2013 Minute Meditation for 1/18/2013



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Mark: Most of what we know about Mark comes directly from the New Testament. He is usually identified with the Mark of Acts 12:12. (When Peter escaped from prison, he went to the home of Mark's mother.) 
<p>Paul and Barnabas took him along on the first missionary journey, but for some reason Mark returned alone to Jerusalem. It is evident, from Paul's refusal to let Mark accompany him on the second journey despite Barnabas's insistence, that Mark had displeased Paul. Because Paul later asks Mark to visit him in prison, we may assume the trouble did not last long. </p><p>The oldest and the shortest of the four Gospels, the Gospel of Mark emphasizes Jesus' rejection by humanity while being God's triumphant envoy. Probably written for Gentile converts in Rome—after the death of Peter and Paul sometime between A.D. 60 and 70—Mark's Gospel is the gradual manifestation of a "scandal": a crucified Messiah. </p><p>Evidently a friend of Mark (Peter called him "my son"), Peter is only one of the Gospel sources, others being the Church in Jerusalem (Jewish roots) and the Church at Antioch (largely Gentile). </p><p>Like one other Gospel writer, Luke, Mark was not one of the 12 apostles. We cannot be certain whether he knew Jesus personally. Some scholars feel that the evangelist is speaking of himself when describing the arrest of Jesus in Gethsemane: "Now a young man followed him wearing nothing but a linen cloth about his body. They seized him, but he left the cloth behind and ran off naked" (Mark 14:51-52). </p><p>Others hold Mark to be the first bishop of Alexandria, Egypt. Venice, famous for the Piazza San Marco, claims Mark as its patron saint; the large basilica there is believed to contain his remains. </p><p>A winged lion is Mark's symbol. The lion derives from Mark's description of John the Baptist as a "voice of one crying out in the desert" (Mark 1:3), which artists compared to a roaring lion. The wings come from the application of Ezekiel's vision of four winged creatures (Ezekiel, chapter one) to the evangelists.</p> American Catholic Blog Moodiness is nothing else but the fruit of pride.

 
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Ignorance of scripture is ignorance of Christ. Do you know these Bible passages?

Mysteries of the Virgin Mary

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CATHOLIC GREETINGS
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Would someone you know make a good priest? Use Catholic Greetings today to send him a prayer.

Infant Baptism
Welcome the newest members of your parish family with an e-card from Catholic Greetings!
Prayer for Vocations
Each January the Church reminds us to pray for all vocations: priesthood, religious, married, and single life.
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The Lord’s baptism began his life of ministry, just as our baptisms begin our lives of service to God’s people.



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