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Bible Reflections View Comments

Why Do We Search for What's Lost?
By Diane M. Houdek
Source: Bringing Home the Word
Published: Sunday, September 15, 2013
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I hate losing things. Not big things, although those losses carry their own heartache. No, I hate losing little, insignificant things: a favorite pen, a book that I read long ago and suddenly thought of again, a particular item of clothing that I may or may not have given to Goodwill. I will tear the house apart looking for the lost item. I will obsess about it until I find it—or have to admit defeat. More often than not, I find it after I stop looking.

The interesting thing about this quirk of mine is that I can see a bit of it in the parables in today’s Gospel. They each focus on a search for what’s lost, and the energy of the search is far greater than the thing being sought would seem to warrant.

The woman sweeping her house and going over every inch of it with a lamp for a small coin probably wasted far more oil for her lamp than the coin was worth. Certainly what she spent on the party far outweighed the discovery.

Commentators often point out the absurdity of the shepherd exposing an entire flock of sheep to the dangers of the wilderness in order to search for one lost lamb that may already have become a meal for a wolf. The wastrel younger son in the longer story certainly seems like no real loss to a responsible and upstanding family.

The very insignificance of these lost things is what Jesus wants to emphasize. Some of the Pharisees and scribes have criticized him for associating with sinners. To their eyes, these people aren’t worth a second glance, let alone the time and attention Jesus gives them. They have time only for important things and the right sort of people.

We might say that they have their priorities straight. But we would be wrong, at least from God’s perspective. They’re judging others based on surface realities alone. And they’re seeing those people as separate from themselves, separate from God.

Jesus reminds us that people are important not because of who they are or what they do, but because of their relationship to God.

This is usually what happens when I’m obsessing about something that I’ve lost. It’s usually something attached to a memory, to a friend, to something that matters to me but is only incidentally attached to a particular object. And I forget that I’ve lost only the object, not the memory or the relationship itself. Last December I looked high and low for a plush Santa that I’d had since childhood, knowing all the time that what I was really searching for was a connection to my mom, who had died in October.

In the reading from Exodus, the aftermath of the golden calf episode, Moses reminds the Lord that these people who have strayed are nevertheless the heirs to the covenant God made with Abraham and renewed at Sinai. It’s not because of their virtue, their good behavior, their status. It’s the inherent worth they have as people created and redeemed by a loving and merciful God.

In the end, then, our lives are about our relationship with God and with one another. This is why when we’re lost, our God seeks us out. This is why when our own key relationships falter, we move heaven and earth to reconcile. We are one, and that unity is broken if any part is missing.


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Leopold Mandic: Western Christians who are working for greater dialogue with Orthodox Christians may be reaping the fruits of Father Leopold’s prayers.
<p>A native of Croatia, Leopold joined the Capuchin Franciscans and was ordained several years later in spite of several health problems. He could not speak loudly enough to preach publicly. For many years he also suffered from severe arthritis, poor eyesight and a stomach ailment.
</p><p>Leopold taught patrology, the study of the Church Fathers, to the clerics of his province for several years, but he is best known for his work in the confessional, where he sometimes spent 13-15 hours a day. Several bishops sought out his spiritual advice.
</p><p>Leopold’s dream was to go to the Orthodox Christians and work for the reunion of Roman Catholicism and Orthodoxy. His health never permitted it. Leopold often renewed his vow to go to the Eastern Christians; the cause of unity was constantly in his prayers.
</p><p>At a time when Pope Pius XII said that the greatest sin of our time is "to have lost all sense of sin," Leopold had a profound sense of sin and an even firmer sense of God’s grace awaiting human cooperation.
</p><p>Leopold, who lived most of his life in Padua, died on July 30, 1942, and was canonized in 1982.</p> American Catholic Blog Confession is one of the greatest gifts Christ gave to His Church. The sacrament of penance offers you grace that is incomparable in your quest for sanctity.

 
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