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Bible Reflections View Comments

Are We Too Busy to Hear the Lord?
By Diane M. Houdek
Source: Bringing Home the Word
Published: Sunday, July 21, 2013
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In today’s Gospel we hear the familiar story of Mary and Martha, the two sisters who, along with their brother, Lazarus, welcome Jesus into their home in Bethany. This family must have been particularly close to Jesus. We also see them in John’s Gospel, when Lazarus dies and Martha and Mary confront Jesus over his late arrival. In both stories, the sisters are both clearly familiar enough with Jesus to be able to speak to him directly.

This story offers scholars a look at cultural conventions of the time—and ways in which Jesus was willing to bend those conventions in service of the Gospel. They talk about how Mary, in assuming the listening role of a disciple, probably scandalized onlookers because such a role was reserved for men. They say Jesus is affirming that Mary had the right to assume that role.

But there’s more to the story than a lesson in first-century Palestinian culture, or a debate over gender-specific roles. The story of Mary and Martha can be set in our own kitchens and living rooms—or factory floors and corporate offices. My sister and I have a running joke that she’s Martha and I’m Mary. When either one of us uses the name, it speaks volumes. She might be telling me to get something done. I might be telling her to take time to relax.

Many of us have had Martha’s experience of feeling as though someone else was getting away with not carrying their fair share of the load. It might be a sibling not helping with dishes—or the care of elderly parents. It might be a coworker who takes everyone else’s ideas and presents them as original thoughts to much praise—and compensation. It might be someone who consistently shirks difficult tasks with one excuse or another.

It’s easy to sympathize with Martha and to be shocked at Jesus’s admonition that Mary had chosen the better part. Our busyness becomes its own rationalization. When we’re busy, we feel like our lives have more value. When we’re busy, we don’t have to be available to help others. When we’re busy, we don’t have to listen to God asking us to do something different. Jesus tells Martha, “You are worried and anxious about many things.” Most likely he would tell us the same thing. When we find ourselves feeling stressed by demands and expectations, we might ask how many of those things are truly essential in the larger picture. If we can do this, we will discover for ourselves what it means to choose the better part.

Today’s first reading from Genesis shows us that Abraham was every bit as busy as Martha in providing hospitality for his visitors, but he did it with ease and a lack of anxiety. Perhaps we can learn from him to do what we’re doing without worrying about other people’s expectations or contributions. Like Mary sitting at the feet of Jesus, he was focused on the one thing necessary at the time. And in doing so, he was creating a restful oasis for his visitors. And the Lord blessed his efforts.

Our world needs both Martha’s activity and Mary’s prayerful attention to the word of God. The former doesn’t need to be restless and anxious; the latter doesn’t need to be passive. We will be at our best when we can suit our personalities to the needs of the moment, always being attentive to the Lord’s deepest desire for our lives.


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Cornelius: 
		<p>There was no pope for 14 months after the martyrdom of St. Fabian because of the intensity of the persecution of the Church. During the interval, the Church was governed by a college of priests. St. Cyprian, a friend of Cornelius, writes that Cornelius was elected pope "by the judgment of God and of Christ, by the testimony of most of the clergy, by the vote of the people, with the consent of aged priests and of good men." </p>
		<p>The greatest problem of Cornelius's two-year term as pope had to do with the Sacrament of Penance and centered on the readmission of Christians who had denied their faith during the time of persecution. Two extremes were finally both condemned. Cyprian, primate of North Africa, appealed to the pope to confirm his stand that the relapsed could be reconciled only by the decision of the bishop. </p>
		<p>In Rome, however, Cornelius met with the opposite view. After his election, a priest named Novatian (one of those who had governed the Church) had himself consecrated a rival bishop of Rome—one of the first antipopes. He denied that the Church had any power to reconcile not only the apostates, but also those guilty of murder, adultery, fornication or second marriage! Cornelius had the support of most of the Church (especially of Cyprian of Africa) in condemning Novatianism, though the sect persisted for several centuries. Cornelius held a synod at Rome in 251 and ordered the "relapsed" to be restored to the Church with the usual "medicines of repentance." </p>
		<p>The friendship of Cornelius and Cyprian was strained for a time when one of Cyprian's rivals made accusations about him. But the problem was cleared up. </p>
		<p>A document from Cornelius shows the extent of organization in the Church of Rome in the mid-third century: 46 priests, seven deacons, seven subdeacons. It is estimated that the number of Christians totaled about 50,000. </p>
		<p>Cornelius died as a result of the hardships of his exile in what is now Civitavecchia (near Rome). <br /> </p>
American Catholic Blog For God judged it better to bring good out of evil than not to permit any evil to exist. —St. Augustine

 
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