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Bible Reflections View Comments

"Why after you?"
By Diane M. Houdek
Source: Bringing Home the Word
Published: Sunday, June 23, 2013
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There’s a story of St. Francis that tells us one of his earliest followers, Brother Masseo, asked him one day, “Why after you? Why does everyone follow after you?” Francis was indeed a popular and charismatic figure. But ultimately in following Francis, people somehow perceived that they were following Christ. We’ve seen a similar reaction in the positive response people have shown to the pope who has taken the name Francis.

Whether in the first or the thirteenth or the twenty-first century, the mark of authenticity in the people we choose to follow lies in their faithfulness to a genuine call from God to lead others back to that same God. The true spiritual leader disappears in pointing to the divine.

Christianity is not a cult of personality, a group of people swayed by a charismatic leader and willing to die for him. We’ve seen in our own time what this sort of pseudo-religion looks like. We’ve seen the documentaries on Jonestown, Waco and Heaven’s Gate. We’ve seen that cults of personality nearly always die with the death of the person at their center.

Today’s Gospel reminds us that our faith is not a matter for popularity polls. Jesus asks his followers who people say that he is. But he’s not really interested in the responses they give. He’s heard all that before. And he knows that we have, too. No, the real question is the one he asks Peter. “And who do you say that I am?” Jesus isn’t asking because he wants to know. He’s asking because he wants Peter to know.

In Luke’s Gospel, the one that we hear today, Jesus immediately responds to Peter’s declaration with his first prediction of the terrible suffering and death that the Messiah will have to endure before the resurrection to eternal glory. This is the turning point of the Gospel. This is how we know that who we follow is different than charismatic leaders before or since. Jesus is committed not to power, not to glory, but only to the truth revealed by his Father in heaven.

We don’t follow Jesus because he promises all of our problems will be solved. Rather, he promises that in the midst of the worst things we can imagine, he will be with us, helping us to bear those tragedies. We follow Jesus because he promises that suffering is not the final word. Jesus never lies to his followers and tells them that the road ahead will be easy and carefree. He knows that’s a lie, however much we might long to believe it. He tells them that the destination is worth the trials along the way.

Jesus’ great gift to us is his vision of the kingdom. And he promises that the kingdom is indeed begun in the midst of this earthly journey. When we live according to his vision, we bring that kingdom into clearer focus. We make it a little bit more apparent to the people around us. We bring about a little more justice, a little more peace, a little more equality for those who suffer.

We follow the greatest man who ever lived, but we follow him not because he didn’t die, but because he died and was raised. We follow him because in the midst of his humanity, we see God’s divinity. This is a truth that has been revealed to us by God’s grace. And in that grace, we can reveal it to others by the way we live our lives in imitation of Christ.


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Pierre Toussaint: 
		<p>Born in modern-day Haiti and brought to New York City as a slave, Pierre died a free man, a renowned hairdresser and one of New York City’s most well-known Catholics. <br /><br />Pierre Bérard, a plantation owner, made Toussaint a house slave and allowed his grandmother to teach her grandson how to read and write. In his early 20s, Pierre, his younger sister, his aunt and two other house slaves accompanied their master’s son to New York City because of political unrest at home. Apprenticed to a local hairdresser, Pierre learned the trade quickly and eventually worked very successfully in the homes of rich women in New York City. <br /><br />When his master died, Pierre was determined to support his master’s widow, himself and the other house slaves. He was freed shortly before the widow’s death in 1807. </p>
		<p>Four years later he married Marie Rose Juliette, whose freedom he had purchased. They later adopted Euphémie, his orphaned niece. Both preceded him in death. He attended daily Mass at St. Peter’s Church on Barclay Street, the same parish that St. Elizabeth Seton attended. <br /><br />Pierre donated to various charities, generously assisting blacks and whites in need. He and his wife opened their home to orphans and educated them. The couple also nursed abandoned people who were suffering from yellow fever. Urged to retire and enjoy the wealth he had accumulated, Pierre responded, “I have enough for myself, but if I stop working I have not enough for others.” <br /><br />He was originally buried outside St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral, where he was once refused entrance because of his race. His sanctity and the popular devotion to him caused his body to be moved to St. Patrick’s Cathedral on Fifth Avenue. <br /><br />Pierre Toussaint was declared Venerable in 1996.</p>
American Catholic Blog It’s through suffering that we grow in endurance, character, and ultimately, in hope. Our suffering is not without value if we know Jesus. When you are suffering, you can pray and unite your sufferings to the only one who truly loves you perfectly or knows all you are feeling.

The Blessing of Family

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Ven. Pierre Toussaint
This former slave is one of many American holy people whose life particularly models Christian values.

Congratulations
Rejoice with a friend who is transitioning from the highs and lows of daily employment.

Birthday
Best wishes for a joyous and peaceful birthday!

Memorial Day (U.S.)
Remember today all those who have fought and died for peace.

Pentecost
As Church we rely on the Holy Spirit to form us in the image of Christ.




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