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Bible Reflections View Comments

Jesus Went There Before Us
By Diane M. Houdek
Source: Bringing Home the Word
Published: Sunday, March 24, 2013
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We begin the liturgy with Jesus’s triumphant entry into Jerusalem. The citizens welcome him with palm branches and shouts of “Hosanna to the Son of David.” It seems to be his finest hour, the popular recognition of who he is as the long-awaited Messiah. But we know from elsewhere in the Gospels that the popular idea of the Messiah was not the role that Jesus was destined to fill. All too soon the fickle crowds will be turned by some of their leaders to condemn this very person they greet so enthusiastically. The disciples’ heads must have been spinning at the sudden reversal of fortune.

Our own liturgy moves quickly from the procession with palms into the reading of the Passion. This is not a dramatic recreation of Jesus’s entry into Jerusalem so much as it is an acknowledgment of our own shifting back and forth between faith and doubt, certainty and disbelief, triumph and tragedy.

Reflecting on this movement from triumph to tragedy to the ultimate victory during Holy Week can help us understand the way the Paschal Mystery manifests itself in our own lives. As members of the body of Christ, we, too, experience the death and resurrection that Jesus did. We have all had experiences of life changing in the blink of an eye, events leaving us gasping for breath and searching for meaning.

We can begin to find that meaning in the awareness that everything in our lives—the heights of joy and triumph, the depths of suffering and death—is united with the life of Christ. He experienced what we experience and transformed it through his death and resurrection. It doesn’t make it any easier while we’re going through it, but it does give us something to hang on to, something that can sustain us in the chaos.

St. Luke gives us many memorable scenes unique to his account of the Passion. Only from Luke do we hear the story of the two thieves crucified with Jesus, men who knew that they deserved this punishment—and who knew, too, that this man between them did not. In the depths of his despair, the one we know as Dismas, the good thief, asks Jesus, “Remember me when you enter into your kingdom.” Jesus promises him, “This day you will be with me in Paradise.” Luke also tells us that Jesus says, “Father, forgive them for they know not what they do.” We might find comfort in these words when we find ourselves acting out of anger or frustration and hurting those we love.

We celebrate these feasts every year as a reminder that Jesus knows what we’re going through because he went through it before us. Enter into Holy Week in a spirit of prayer. Pay attention to the Scriptures. Often our own problems are mirrored in the events of Jesus’s Passion. Think about some of the less-emphasized stations of the cross (Jesus is rejected. Jesus falls for the second time.) and reflect on how you have experienced these events.

Jesus’s last words in Luke’s passion are, “Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.” These words are perhaps our best response to the difficult times in our lives. We are forever in God’s hands. Knowing this in the depths of our beings gives us all the assurance we need. It doesn’t make the bad times go away, but it does promise that the darkness will not triumph.


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Mary Angela Truszkowska: Today we honor a woman who submitted to God's will throughout her life—a life filled with pain and suffering. 
<p>Born in 1825 in central Poland and baptized Sophia, she contracted tuberculosis as a young girl. The forced period of convalescence gave her ample time for reflection. Sophia felt called to serve God by working with the poor, including street children and the elderly homeless in Warsaw's slums. In time, her cousin joined her in the work. </p><p>In 1855, the two women made private vows and consecrated themselves to the Blessed Mother. New followers joined them. Within two years they formed a new congregation, which came to be known as the Felician Sisters. As their numbers grew, so did their work, and so did the pressures on Mother Angela (the new name Sophia took in religious life). </p><p>Mother Angela served as superior for many years until ill health forced her to resign at the age of 44. She watched the order grow and expand, including missions to the United States among the sons and daughters of Polish immigrants. </p><p>Pope John Paul II beatified her in 1993.</p> American Catholic Blog I truly seek a very solitary, simple and primitive life with no labels attached. However, there must be love in it, and not an abstract love but a real love for real people.

 
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