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Bible Reflections View Comments

Jesus Went There Before Us
By Diane M. Houdek
Source: Bringing Home the Word
Published: Sunday, March 24, 2013
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We begin the liturgy with Jesus’s triumphant entry into Jerusalem. The citizens welcome him with palm branches and shouts of “Hosanna to the Son of David.” It seems to be his finest hour, the popular recognition of who he is as the long-awaited Messiah. But we know from elsewhere in the Gospels that the popular idea of the Messiah was not the role that Jesus was destined to fill. All too soon the fickle crowds will be turned by some of their leaders to condemn this very person they greet so enthusiastically. The disciples’ heads must have been spinning at the sudden reversal of fortune.

Our own liturgy moves quickly from the procession with palms into the reading of the Passion. This is not a dramatic recreation of Jesus’s entry into Jerusalem so much as it is an acknowledgment of our own shifting back and forth between faith and doubt, certainty and disbelief, triumph and tragedy.

Reflecting on this movement from triumph to tragedy to the ultimate victory during Holy Week can help us understand the way the Paschal Mystery manifests itself in our own lives. As members of the body of Christ, we, too, experience the death and resurrection that Jesus did. We have all had experiences of life changing in the blink of an eye, events leaving us gasping for breath and searching for meaning.

We can begin to find that meaning in the awareness that everything in our lives—the heights of joy and triumph, the depths of suffering and death—is united with the life of Christ. He experienced what we experience and transformed it through his death and resurrection. It doesn’t make it any easier while we’re going through it, but it does give us something to hang on to, something that can sustain us in the chaos.

St. Luke gives us many memorable scenes unique to his account of the Passion. Only from Luke do we hear the story of the two thieves crucified with Jesus, men who knew that they deserved this punishment—and who knew, too, that this man between them did not. In the depths of his despair, the one we know as Dismas, the good thief, asks Jesus, “Remember me when you enter into your kingdom.” Jesus promises him, “This day you will be with me in Paradise.” Luke also tells us that Jesus says, “Father, forgive them for they know not what they do.” We might find comfort in these words when we find ourselves acting out of anger or frustration and hurting those we love.

We celebrate these feasts every year as a reminder that Jesus knows what we’re going through because he went through it before us. Enter into Holy Week in a spirit of prayer. Pay attention to the Scriptures. Often our own problems are mirrored in the events of Jesus’s Passion. Think about some of the less-emphasized stations of the cross (Jesus is rejected. Jesus falls for the second time.) and reflect on how you have experienced these events.

Jesus’s last words in Luke’s passion are, “Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.” These words are perhaps our best response to the difficult times in our lives. We are forever in God’s hands. Knowing this in the depths of our beings gives us all the assurance we need. It doesn’t make the bad times go away, but it does promise that the darkness will not triumph.


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Joan of Arc: 
		<p>Burned at the stake as a heretic after a politically-motivated trial, Joan was beatified in 1909 and canonized in 1920.</p>
		<p>Born of a fairly well-to-do peasant couple in Domremy-Greux (southeast of Paris), Joan was only 12 when she experienced a vision and heard voices that she later identified as Sts. Michael the Archangel, Catherine of Alexandria, and Margaret of Antioch.</p>
		<p>During the Hundred Years War, she led French troops against the English and recaptured the cities of Orléans and Troyes. This enabled Charles VII to be crowned as king in Reims in 1429. Captured near Compiegne the following year, she was sold to the English and placed on trial for heresy and witchcraft. Professors at the University of Paris supported Bishop Pierre Cauchon of Beauvis, the judge at her trial; Cardinal Henry Beaufort of Winchester, England, participated in the questioning of Joan in prison. In the end, she was condemned for wearing men's clothes. The English resented France's military success–to which Joan contributed. </p>
		<p>On this day in 1431, she was burned at the stake in Rouen, and her ashes were scattered in the Seine River. A second Church trial 25 years later nullified the earlier verdict, which was reached under political pressure.</p>
		<p>Remembered by most people for her military exploits, Joan had a great love for the sacraments, which strengthened her compassion toward the poor. Popular devotion to her increased greatly in 19th-century France and later among French soldiers during World War I. Theologian George Tavard writes that her life "offers a perfect example of the conjunction of contemplation and action" because her spiritual insight is that there should be a "unity of heaven and earth."</p>
		<p>Joan of Arc has been the subject of many books, plays, operas, and movies. </p>
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