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Les Misérables View Comments
by Sister Rose Pacatte, FSP

Les Misérables
Director Tom Hooper, who won an Academy Award in 2011 for The King’s Speech, has created a musical masterwork in bringing the famed London musical to the screen. Victor Hugo’s 1862 novel has been made into more than 70 motion pictures since the Lumière Brothers’ 1897 silent version. The novel once had a place on the Vatican’s “Index of Forbidden Books” but was granted a reprieve in 1959 and lives again in theaters everywhere.

Jean Valjean (Hugh Jackman) has spent 19 years in prison, condemned to hard labor for stealing bread for his sister’s family. Just before Valjean’s release, Inspector Javert (Russell Crowe) tells him he must report monthly or his parole will be revoked and he will be sent back to prison.

Once free, the angry Valjean accepts hospitality from a bishop and then steals the silver. When police capture him, the bishop says he gave the silver as a gift. This act of mercy puts Valjean on a path of righteousness, but he skips parole and becomes a factory owner and mayor of a town.

A young, unmarried woman, Fantine (Anne Hathaway), is cast out of his factory though she is supporting a young daughter, Cosette (Isabelle Allen as a child; Amanda Seyfried in later years). Valjean promises to care for her as Fantine is dying. Javert shows up again, and in a series of events, Valjean flees with Cosette to Paris to live in solitude until the revolution is revived.

Les Misérables is a profoundly Christian story bursting with themes from the Gospels, the sacraments, the creed, and morality. The actors sing live, and we see every emotion through intimate camera shots. At almost three hours in length, fans of the musical will be pleased, and my guess is there will not be a dry eye in the house.

A-3, PG-13 ■ Battle and gun violence, prostitution, mature themes.

Zero Dark Thirty
In the years immediately following the 9/11 attacks, the CIA uses enhanced interrogation methods to break men suspected of being part of al-Qaeda’s network in the hunt for Osama bin Laden. At a secret location, CIA analyst Maya (Jessica Chastain) looks on as Dan (Jason Clarke) uses waterboarding and other means to get a man to talk.

Maya is new at the US Embassy in Pakistan and spends years tracking people until a file clerk discovers a link that had been overlooked years before. After Maya survives the explosion at a Marriott hotel and an assassination attack, she returns to Washington, DC, where she tries to get her superiors to act on the information she has developed. A team of Navy SEALs is finally dispatched in May 2010.

Director Kathryn Bigelow, the first woman to win a best director Oscar, for 2008’s The Hurt Locker, is very comfortable making tough movies about aspects of life and human behavior that are difficult, if not unnerving, to ponder.

The cinematography in Zero Dark Thirty gives the impression of being in the war zone, though this is not a documentary. It is fascinating to follow the thread of discovery to bin Laden’s location and to learn the new post-9/11 “craft” of pursuit and evasion. It is less thrilling to watch as bin Laden and several others are killed.

The psychological letdown for both the military and Maya is palpable. Bigelow and writer Mark Boal tell a good story, but, in the end, I think they may be saying that peace is more elusive than ever.

Not yet rated, PG ■ Torture, violence, disturbing images, war, language.

Parental Guidance
Artie Decker (Billy Crystal) loves his job as a sports announcer for the minor league baseball team in Fresno, California, but dreams of working for the San Francisco Giants. When he’s suddenly let go from his job, he and his wife, Diane (Bette Midler), are asked by their daughter, Alice (Marisa Tomei), to babysit for their three grandkids in Atlanta while she and her husband, Phil (Tom Everett Scott), are on a trip.

Alice and Phil live in a modernized house and raise their kids with a lot of rules. The grandparents arrive, but Alice doesn’t trust them and returns from the airport just in time to see chaos erupt.

The previews make this film look like a silly comedy, but it is actually a warm, rich story about parenting, reconciliation, forgiveness, and love that transcends generations. It’s also about baseball. The windup is a little on the slow side, but, by the end, the film hits a grand slam. I am very happy to call Parental Guidance a true family film.

A-1, PG ■ Some rude humor.

A-1 General patronage
A-2 Adults and adolescents
A-3 Adults
L Limited adult audience
O Morally offensive

The USCCB's Office for Film and Broadcasting gives these ratings. See

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Francis of Assisi: Francis of Assisi was a poor little man who astounded and inspired the Church by taking the gospel literally—not in a narrow fundamentalist sense, but by actually following all that Jesus said and did, joyfully, without limit and without a sense of self-importance. 
<p>Serious illness brought the young Francis to see the emptiness of his frolicking life as leader of Assisi's youth. Prayer—lengthy and difficult—led him to a self-emptying like that of Christ, climaxed by embracing a leper he met on the road. It symbolized his complete obedience to what he had heard in prayer: "Francis! Everything you have loved and desired in the flesh it is your duty to despise and hate, if you wish to know my will. And when you have begun this, all that now seems sweet and lovely to you will become intolerable and bitter, but all that you used to avoid will turn itself to great sweetness and exceeding joy." </p><p>From the cross in the neglected field-chapel of San Damiano, Christ told him, "Francis, go out and build up my house, for it is nearly falling down." Francis became the totally poor and humble workman. </p><p>He must have suspected a deeper meaning to "build up my house." But he would have been content to be for the rest of his life the poor "nothing" man actually putting brick on brick in abandoned chapels. He gave up all his possessions, piling even his clothes before his earthly father (who was demanding restitution for Francis' "gifts" to the poor) so that he would be totally free to say, "Our Father in heaven." He was, for a time, considered to be a religious fanatic, begging from door to door when he could not get money for his work, evokng sadness or disgust to the hearts of his former friends, ridicule from the unthinking. </p><p>But genuineness will tell. A few people began to realize that this man was actually trying to be Christian. He really believed what Jesus said: "Announce the kingdom! Possess no gold or silver or copper in your purses, no traveling bag, no sandals, no staff" (Luke 9:1-3). </p><p>Francis' first rule for his followers was a collection of texts from the Gospels. He had no idea of founding an order, but once it began he protected it and accepted all the legal structures needed to support it. His devotion and loyalty to the Church were absolute and highly exemplary at a time when various movements of reform tended to break the Church's unity. </p><p>He was torn between a life devoted entirely to prayer and a life of active preaching of the Good News. He decided in favor of the latter, but always returned to solitude when he could. He wanted to be a missionary in Syria or in Africa, but was prevented by shipwreck and illness in both cases. He did try to convert the sultan of Egypt during the Fifth Crusade. </p><p>During the last years of his relatively short life (he died at 44), he was half blind and seriously ill. Two years before his death, he received the stigmata, the real and painful wounds of Christ in his hands, feet and side. </p><p>On his deathbed, he said over and over again the last addition to his Canticle of the Sun, "Be praised, O Lord, for our Sister Death." He sang Psalm 141, and at the end asked his superior to have his clothes removed when the last hour came and for permission to expire lying naked on the earth, in imitation of his Lord.</p> American Catholic Blog The joy of the Gospel is not just any joy. It consists in knowing one is welcomed and loved by God…. And so we are able to open our eyes again, to overcome sadness and mourning to strike up a new song. And this true joy remains even amid trial, even amid suffering, for it is not a superficial joy: it permeates the depths of the person who entrusts himself to the Lord and confides in him.

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