AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Year of Mercy
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Shopping
Donate
Blog
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds

Chasing Mavericks View Comments
by Sister Rose Pacatte, FSP


Chasing Mavericks
Jay Moriarity (Jonny Weston) is transfixed by the ocean’s waves near Santa Clara, California. As a boy, he studies the tides and can predict when the best swells will occur for surfing. When he is 15, he steals a ride with his neighbor, Frosty (Gerard Butler), and finds out about the mythical mavericks—gigantic waves that pound the northern California shore near his home. He asks the taciturn Frosty to teach him to surf the big waves.

Frosty eventually agrees but lays out a training course that will test both of them. Frosty’s character-building program has four pillars for a solid human foundation: mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual. In between the grueling training, Frosty assigns essays for Jay to write.

Confronting inner fears is tough for Jay, as he is dealing with a missing father and a mother addicted to alcohol. The majesty of the waves crashing along rocky cliffs parallels the challenges both men face in their lives.

Chasing Mavericks is a master/disciple, father/son story where both characters learn transforming lessons from the other. The camera action is visceral and breathtaking. Both Butler and Weston do their own surfing, which gives the film an authentic feel.

The real Jay Moriarity, who died in 2001 after a diving accident, was a “soul surfer.” Directors Michael Apted and Curtis Hanson, and writer Kario Salem, respect the life and achievements of this brave young man whose life continues to inspire surfers and athletes everywhere with the motto, “Live Like Jay,” which is displayed in his hometown.
A-2, PG  Peril, domestic violence, bullying.

Life of Pi
It’s 1977, and Pi (Irrfan Kahn), who lives in Winnipeg, Canada, tells an unbelievable story. He has studied theology and zoology and, as he tells it, the tale is enough to make someone believe in God.

When Pi was young, he lived in Pondicherry, India, a former French colony. Pi’s real name is Piscine Molitor, after a Parisian swimming pool beloved by an honorary uncle. Pi is a Hindu, but, at 14, he is baptized a Catholic and soon after he becomes a Muslim. He practices all three faiths on his journey toward understanding the universe and his place in it.

His father (Adil Hussain) buys a zoo and then, for political reasons, decides to move the animals and his family to Canada by cargo ship. A couple of days outside Manila, a ferocious storm sinks the ship. Pi escapes on a lifeboat and is soon joined by a female orangutan, a zebra, a Bengal tiger, and a hyena. Pi and the tiger, named Richard Parker, struggle to survive on their own in a tenuous coexistence.

After 277 days at sea, they wash up on the west coast of Mexico. And this is where things get more complicated. No one believes Pi’s story. Should he tell them the facts? What will they believe?

Some may think Life of Pi, directed by Academy Award-winner Ang Lee, is a parable showing that all religions are the same, but I think it is more of an allegory about faith and one man’s epic journey to discover what matters in life. His story is a pilgrim’s progress toward human and spiritual maturity.

Life of Pi is a film that encourages long talks with family and friends to discover what it really means.
Not yet rated, PG  Peril.

A Royal Affair
In 1766, the little sister of Britain’s King George III, Princess Caroline Mathilde (Alicia Vikander), is betrothed to her cousin, King Christian VII (Mikkel Boe Følsgaard) of Denmark. The king, a mentally ill philanderer, has to be coaxed into fathering a child.

The king’s ministers are concerned about the monarch’s instability, so they hire a German doctor, Johann Friedrich Struensee (Mads Mikkelsen), to be at his side. The king comes to trust the doctor. But when they return to court after a tour of Europe, the queen and Struensee are attracted to each other.

Denmark is simmering in the late 18th century. The alliance between the ruling class and the Evangelical Church is facing off against the professional classes and the poor, who are influenced by the secular values of the Enlightenment. Struensee and the queen influence the king to make laws that favor the poor. The king fires his ministers, and he and Struensee rule Denmark briefly.

A Royal Affair is an excellent historical drama about a place and time about which we know little. It provides a rare glimpse into how the Enlightenment influenced countries. The film also shows how difficult it is to introduce authentic social change based on human dignity.
Not yet rated, R Mature themes, language, and violence.

CATHOLIC CLASSIFICATIONS
A-1 General patronage
A-2 Adults and adolescents
A-3 Adults
L Limited adult audience
O Morally offensive

The USCCB's Office for Film and Broadcasting gives these ratings. See www.usccb.org/movies/index.htm.

Find reviews by Sister Rose and others at www.CatholicMovieReviews.org.

Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus



Peter Chrysologus: A man who vigorously pursues a goal may produce results far beyond his expectations and his intentions. Thus it was with Peter of the Golden Words, as he was called, who as a young man became bishop of Ravenna, the capital of the empire in the West. 
<p>At the time there were abuses and vestiges of paganism evident in his diocese, and these he was determined to battle and overcome. His principal weapon was the short sermon, and many of them have come down to us. They do not contain great originality of thought. They are, however, full of moral applications, sound in doctrine and historically significant in that they reveal Christian life in fifth-century Ravenna. So authentic were the contents of his sermons that, some 13 centuries later, he was declared a doctor of the Church by Pope Benedict XIII. He who had earnestly sought to teach and motivate his own flock was recognized as a teacher of the universal Church. </p><p>In addition to his zeal in the exercise of his office, Peter Chrysologus was distinguished by a fierce loyalty to the Church, not only in its teaching, but in its authority as well. He looked upon learning not as a mere opportunity but as an obligation for all, both as a development of God-given faculties and as a solid support for the worship of God. </p><p>Some time before his death, St. Peter returned to Imola, his birthplace, where he died around A.D. 450.</p> American Catholic Blog What gives manners their social weight? More than simple etiquette, it’s their message: I am treating you with courtesy because I believe you deserve it. Manners talk respect. It’s not a stretch to hear manners as a small piece of kindness.

New Call-to-action

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Mary's Flower - Fuchsia
Mary, nourish my love for you and for Jesus.

Wedding Anniversary
We continue to fall in love again and again throughout our years together.

Summer Vacation
If your summer plans include a trip to the beach, take a child’s delight in this element of creation.

World Youth Day
Encourage young people to pray with and for their contemporaries in Krakow this week.

Sts. Joachim and Anne
Tell your grandparents what they mean to you with this Catholic Greetings e-card.


Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2016