AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds

advertisement

Summer Film Retreat 2012 View Comments
by Sister Rose Pacatte, FSP


Summer Film Retreat 2012
For Lent this year, the Pauline Center for Media Studies hosted a six-part weekly program using The Way, starring Martin Sheen. In the film written and directed by Sheen’s son, Emilio Estevez, Sheen plays Tom Avery, a widower who travels to France to bring home the body of his son who died in an accident. Tom discovers his son had just set out to make
the 800-kilometer pilgrimage to the shrine of St. James of Compostela and resolves to
take his place on the Camino (see October 2011 St. Anthony Messenger).

Because we wanted to keep the motif of the pilgrimage, even though we met at our center and people arrived by bus or car, our slogan was “If you can’t walk it with your feet, you can do it from your seat!” The same can be said for an annual retreat, which can be made at home if you’re unable to get away to a retreat house. Summertime is ideal to live out Jesus’ invitation to the disciples in Mark 6:31: “Come away by yourselves to a deserted
place and rest a while.”

Narrative films are an ideal way to bridge faith and life, using the format and methodology of the spiritual exercises of St. Ignatius. A Scripture verse that reflects Tom’s reality and journey in The Way is John 9:11.

John Pungente, SJ, and Monty Williams, SJ, have published two books, Finding God in the Dark: Taking the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius to the Movies I & II. Pungente and Williams break down the 30-day retreat into 52 chapters in each volume: one step of the exercises, with Scripture readings, and one film for each week during the year.

The Lights, Camera...Faith! book series can also be used (by Pacatte and Malone, Pauline.org). These volumes include Scripture references, a film, commentary, and
questions for reflection.

For your cinema retreat, you will want to choose quiet time, turn off your phone, and have a Bible, journal, and pen handy. Read the suggested Scripture and then see the film. Afterward, take a break to write your responses to the questions, and take some time for silent prayer.

The Tree of Life


In the 1950s, the struggles of a young father and his eldest son are contrasted with nonlinear images and sequences of God’s creation struggling to be in relationship with the divine. Paul’s Letter to the Romans, especially 5:17, provides a perfect lens to make meaning from this film that requires focus and intentionality on the part of the viewer.

Big Fish

This wondrous, fantastical film, from the creative mind of Tim Burton, explores the relationship between a highly imaginative father and his son, a fact-oriented journalist who feels his father lied to him growing up. He tells his father he doesn’t know who he is. The Gospel passage Matthew 13:10-17 occurs in late July. In it the disciples ask Jesus, “Why do you speak to them in parables?” and Jesus explains.

Amreeka

After 9/11, a Palestinian-Christian woman, Amreeka, applies for a visa to the United States for herself and her son. When it seems that the visa will never come through, it does. They go to Dearborn, Michigan, to stay with her sister and her family. In the face of hardship,
racial stereotyping, and bias, Amreeka and her son persist. She is the woman you would love as a next-door neighbor. Matthew 13:18-23 is about the reward for perseverance.

The Vow

A young married couple (Channing Tatum and Rachel McAdams) are in a car accident, and the wife no longer remembers her husband or their marriage. Based on a true story, the situation presents a moral conundrum: How does a loving husband move forward when his wife doesn’t remember him? This leads the audience to ask: What is the right thing to What is the right thing to do? What would I do in the same situation? How could I cope with such a dilemma? St. Paul offers t
Film Capsules
What to Expect When You’re Expecting

Although this film focuses only on beautiful middle-and upper-middle-class white couples—and a Latino couple who goes to Africa to adopt—I found myself touched and moved at the stories of these couples. I was at once impressed and confused by the religious ritual when Ethiopians give away their children to adoptive Western couples. It’s a little
preachy and uneven. Mature themes.

The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel


With a cast made of British acting royalty, this charming film tells of retirees from the United Kingdom who respond to an ad for exciting—and cheap—retirement living in India. The young bungling owner, Sonny, tells them when things are not what they expect, “Everything will be all right in the end . . . if it’s not all right then it’s not the end.” Indeed. Mature themes; some sexuality.
CATHOLIC CLASSIFICATIONS
A-1 General patronage
A-2 Adults and adolescents
A-3 Adults
L Limited adult audience
O Morally offensive

The USCCB's Office for Film and Broadcasting gives these ratings. See www.usccb.org/movies/index.htm.

Find reviews by Sister Rose and others at www.CatholicMovieReviews.org.

Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus



Ignatius of Loyola: The founder of the Jesuits was on his way to military fame and fortune when a cannon ball shattered his leg. Because there were no books of romance on hand during his convalescence, Ignatius whiled away the time reading a life of Christ and lives of the saints. His conscience was deeply touched, and a long, painful turning to Christ began. Having seen the Mother of God in a vision, he made a pilgrimage to her shrine at Montserrat (near Barcelona). He remained for almost a year at nearby Manresa, sometimes with the Dominicans, sometimes in a pauper’s hospice, often in a cave in the hills praying. After a period of great peace of mind, he went through a harrowing trial of scruples. There was no comfort in anything—prayer, fasting, sacraments, penance. At length, his peace of mind returned. 
<p>It was during this year of conversion that Ignatius began to write down material that later became his greatest work, the <em>Spiritual Exercises</em>. </p><p>He finally achieved his purpose of going to the Holy Land, but could not remain, as he planned, because of the hostility of the Turks. He spent the next 11 years in various European universities, studying with great difficulty, beginning almost as a child. Like many others, his orthodoxy was questioned; Ignatius was twice jailed for brief periods. </p><p>In 1534, at the age of 43, he and six others (one of whom was St. Francis Xavier, December 2) vowed to live in poverty and chastity and to go to the Holy Land. If this became impossible, they vowed to offer themselves to the apostolic service of the pope. The latter became the only choice. Four years later Ignatius made the association permanent. The new Society of Jesus was approved by Paul III, and Ignatius was elected to serve as the first general. </p><p>When companions were sent on various missions by the pope, Ignatius remained in Rome, consolidating the new venture, but still finding time to found homes for orphans, catechumens and penitents. He founded the Roman College, intended to be the model of all other colleges of the Society. </p><p>Ignatius was a true mystic. He centered his spiritual life on the essential foundations of Christianity—the Trinity, Christ, the Eucharist. His spirituality is expressed in the Jesuit motto, <i>ad majorem Dei gloriam</i>—“for the greater glory of God.” In his concept, obedience was to be the prominent virtue, to assure the effectiveness and mobility of his men. All activity was to be guided by a true love of the Church and unconditional obedience to the Holy Father, for which reason all professed members took a fourth vow to go wherever the pope should send them for the salvation of souls.</p> American Catholic Blog Jesus’s humanity and His biological need to be fed Himself gives power and personal force to His teaching that when we feed the hungry and give drink to the thirsty, we do it to Him.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
New from Franciscan Media!
By reflecting on Pope Francis's example and words, you can transform your own life and relationships.
New from Servant Books!
Follow Jesus with the same kind of zeal that Paul had, guided by Mark Hart and Christopher Cuddy!
Wisdom for Women

Learn how the life and teachings of St. Teresa Benedicta of the Cross (Edith Stein) serve as a guide for women’s unique vocations today.

A Wild Ride

Enter the world of medieval England in this account of a rare and courageous woman, Margery Kempe, now a saint of the Anglican church.

The Wisdom of Merton
This book distills wisdom from Merton's books and journals on enduring themes which are relevant to readers today.

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
St. Ignatius Loyola
The founder of the Society of Jesus is also a patron of all who were educated by the Jesuits.
Vacation
Remember when summer seemed to last forever? Send a Catholic Greetings e-card to share that memory.
Love
Love is a daily miracle, just like our heartbeat.
Birthday
Subscribers to Catholic Greetings Premium Service can create a personal calendar to remind them of important birthdays.
Mary's Flower - Fuchsia
Mary, nourish my love for you and for Jesus.

Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic