AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Seasonal
Saints
Special Reports
Movies
Social Media
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds

advertisement

Rethinking Poverty View Comments


The statistics on poverty are overwhelming. You can easily find numbers, graphs, and charts that are sorted by every category imaginable: region, gender, age, median income, and a number of other categories. It’s a lot to swallow.

Those numbers certainly have a place and a purpose. In fact, you can  see some of them on the opposite  page. But, often, what these statistics are missing are the faces behind the numbers. Every one of those numbers represents someone’s grandparent, parent, sibling, spouse, or child.

Think about your definition and vision of poverty. Is it homeless people, ramshackle or makeshift houses, third-world countries, beggars? What if I told you that right now you  could possibly know someone in  poverty or struggling to stay above  the poverty line? Statistics say you probably do.  

Why the Apathy?

As a society, we often hear or see those statistics, then promptly dismiss them. It’s easy to do. Maybe we do it because the numbers seem so daunting. After all, what can one person possibly do to help 46.2 million people living in poverty in the U.S.?

Maybe it’s because we don’t quite understand the stats and their implications. Maybe it’s because those numbers make us feel uncomfortable. Or maybe we don’t see poverty as our problem.  Add to that the stigmas and generalizations placed upon those struggling in poverty—they’re said to be lazy, unmotivated, uneducated. Trying to persuade people to get involved and make a difference is a challenge. Whatever the reason for people not getting involved, though, it’s not acceptable. Not for Catholics, not for Christians.

The Bible is filled with calls to help the least of our brothers and sisters, such as Matthew 25, Luke 6, and many other passages. Our popes and bishops echo this and have repeatedly reminded us of our Gospel obligation. We need to help our brothers and sisters.

In the document Answering the Voice of the Spirit, issued by the Catholic Campaign for Human Development (CCHD), the U.S. bishops say: “Like Jesus, may the Spirit provide us with a voice to cry out for justice for the poor. Remind us that what we do to the least of those among us, we do to you.”

In addition to speaking up, our Church is also doing something to combat poverty through many programs, such as the ones we featured in this special report.

What's Our Part?

Where are we in the equation? What can we as individual Catholics do to reach out to those in need? Here are a few suggestions.

Change your attitude. Too often we paint in broad strokes and make assumptions concerning the poor. Be charitable. People in poverty don’t choose their situation. Who would? Any of us could be one job loss, illness, or tragedy away from joining the ranks of those struggling to keep themselves above the poverty line. Rather than tearing down the poor, why not try to help change their reality?

Hit the grocery. Many parishes have food pantries where those in need can come to get groceries. Add a few items to your normal grocery list to donate.

Work for change. Get involved with organizations, such as St. Vincent de Paul, or programs that work to help people escape the grips of poverty, either through employment, housing, or education. Check with your parish to find opportunities or make connections.

You might find ways to use your skill set to help make a difference in people’s lives. For instance, if you’re a teacher, you could help tutor students so that they can further their education. Education is a key route out of poverty.

Or, if you’re adept at working on houses, you could help with repairs or general upkeep for those who can’t for various reasons.

Pray. Our prayers for people in poverty not only are for them, but also for us. We pray to align ourselves with the spirit of God’s will: we must love one another as we would love ourselves.

In their 2002 pastoral letter, “A Place at the Table,” the U.S. bishops issued a call to Catholics to care for the poor. The letter can be found at: usccb.org.

In the letter, they issued the following challenge: “As Catholics, we must come together with a common conviction that we can no longer tolerate the moral scandal of poverty in our land and so much hunger and deprivation in our world. As believers, we can debate how best to overcome these realities, but we must be united in our determination to do so. Our faith teaches us that poor people are not issues or problems but sisters and brothers in God’s one human family.”

Our leaders are right. People in poverty are our brothers and sisters. We are called to help them. We are compelled to help them. Our faith demands it.


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus


Benedict Joseph Labre: Benedict Joseph Labre was truly eccentric, one of God's special little ones. Born in France and the eldest of 18 children, he studied under his uncle, a parish priest. Because of poor health and a lack of suitable academic preparation he was unsuccessful in his attempts to enter the religious life. Then, at 16 years of age, a profound change took place. Benedict lost his desire to study and gave up all thoughts of the priesthood, much to the consternation of his relatives. 
<p>He became a pilgrim, traveling from one great shrine to another, living off alms. He wore the rags of a beggar and shared his food with the poor. Filled with the love of God and neighbor, Benedict had special devotion to the Blessed Mother and to the Blessed Sacrament. In Rome, where he lived in the Colosseum for a time, he was called "the poor man of the Forty Hours Devotion" and "the beggar of Rome." The people accepted his ragged appearance better than he did. His excuse to himself was that "our comfort is not in this world." </p><p>On the last day of his life, April 16, 1783, Benedict Joseph dragged himself to a church in Rome and prayed there for two hours before he collapsed, dying peacefully in a nearby house. Immediately after his death the people proclaimed him a saint. </p><p>He was officially proclaimed a saint by Pope Leo XIII at canonization ceremonies in 1883.</p> American Catholic Blog Today offers limitless possibilities for holiness. Lean into His grace. The only thing keeping us from sainthood is ourselves.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Pope Francis!

Why did the pope choose the name Francis? Find out in this new book by Gina Loehr.

The Seven Last Words

By focusing on God's love for humanity expressed in the gift of Jesus, The Last Words of Jesus serves as a rich source of meditation throughout the year.

Visiting Mary
In this book Cragon captures the experience of visiting these shrines, giving us a personal glimpse into each place.
John Paul II

Here is a book to be read and treasured as we witness the recognition given John Paul II as a saint for our times.

The Surprising Pope

Get new insight into this humble and gentle man—Pope John XXIII--who ushered in the Church's massive changes of Vatican II.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Holy Thursday
The Church remembers today both the institution of the Eucharist and our mandate to service.
Wednesday of Holy Week
Today join Catholics around the world in offering prayers for our Pope Emeritus on his 87th birthday.
Tuesday of Holy Week
Today keep in prayer all the priests and ministers throughout the world who will preside at Holy Week services.
Monday of Holy Week
Holy Week reminds us of the price Jesus paid for our salvation. Take time for prayer at home and at church.
Palm Sunday
Holy Week services and prayers invite us to follow Jesus into Jerusalem, experiencing the events of his passion and death.

Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic