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Who Are the Poor?
Carol Ann Morrow

We must do more than treat the symptoms of poverty, says Sheila Gilbert, president of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul. We must work to find a cure.

WEB+ The Society of St. Vincent de Paul
Faces of Poverty
Photos by Gregory A. Shemitz

Theresa and Patsy Marino are only two of the 46.2 million Americans who struggle daily for their basic needs.

WEB+ Find out more about Catholic Charities
Two Making a Difference
Susan Hines-Brigger

Fighting poverty starts at home. Here are two stories from the trenches.

WEB+

JustFaith

Brockton Interfaith Community

Catholic Campaign for Human Development

Falling in Love With Christ
Ronald D. Witherup

The apostle Paul saw many similarities between loving Christ and loving one another.

WEB+
Clean Sweep
Charity Vogel

What she found in Lake Erie inspired this woman to launch a local environmental overhaul.

WEB+ Great Lakes Beach Sweep
A Rosary Story
Brian Doyle

It passed from hand to hand, through thick and thin.






to St. Anthony Messenger Print Edition




Agnes of Bohemia: Agnes had no children of her own but was certainly life-giving for all who knew her. 
<p>Agnes was the daughter of Queen Constance and King Ottokar I of Bohemia. At the age of three, she was betrothed to the Duke of Silesia, who died three years later. As she grew up, she decided she wanted to enter the religious life. </p><p>After declining marriages to King Henry VII of Germany and Henry III of England, Agnes was faced with a proposal from Frederick II, the Holy Roman Emperor. She appealed to Pope Gregory IX for help. The pope was persuasive; Frederick magnanimously said that he could not be offended if Agnes preferred the King of Heaven to him. </p><p>After Agnes built a hospital for the poor and a residence for the friars, she financed the construction of a Poor Clare monastery in Prague. In 1236, she and seven other noblewomen entered this monastery. St. Clare sent five sisters from San Damiano to join them, and wrote Agnes four letters advising her on the beauty of her vocation and her duties as abbess. </p><p>Agnes became known for prayer, obedience and mortification. Papal pressure forced her to accept her election as abbess; nevertheless, the title she preferred was "senior sister." Her position did not prevent her from cooking for the other sisters and mending the clothes of lepers. The sisters found her kind but very strict regarding the observance of poverty; she declined her royal brother’s offer to set up an endowment for the monastery. </p><p>Devotion to Agnes arose soon after her death on March 6, 1282. She was canonized in 1989.</p> American Catholic Blog We do not need to pile up words upon words in order to be heard in the heart of God. Jesus also has a very comforting message: The Father knows what we need even before we ask for it.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Feliz Cumpleaños
Spanish-speaking friends will appreciate your thoughtfulness in finding a birthday e-card in Spanish!

Second Sunday in Lent
Lent invites us to open our hearts, minds and bodies to the grace of rebirth.

Thank You
Catholic Greetings offers an assortment of blank e-cards for various occasions.

Caregiver
The caregiver’s hands are the hands of Christ still at work in the world.

Lent
During Lent the whole Christian community follows Christ’s example of penance.


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