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A Deacon's Journey Through Islam View Comments
By Deacon George Dardess

Last May at Nazareth College in Pittsford, New York, Deacon George Dardess discussed the
book Reclaiming Beauty for the Good of the World.

Becoming a Roman Catholic deacon led me into Islam—not by embracing Islam itself, but by embracing it as a sign of the Other whom the deacon has come to serve. The path has been so full of surprises that I can truly say, “God writes straight with crooked lines.”

Yet it’s not only as a deacon that I speak of Islam. I also speak of it as an ordinary American who one day realized that he knew nothing about this “foreign” religion: nothing of its holy book, the Quran, nothing of its teachings, the people who embraced it, their languages and cultures or even the countries where Muslims live. For example, I couldn’t at that time have found Iraq on the map.

The change began in February 1991. I had been watching with horror televised reports of our first Iraq war, “Desert Storm.” As a recently baptized (1983) Catholic Christian, I had absorbed Thomas Merton’s writings on nonviolence; I had been inspired by the U.S. bishops’ 1983 pastoral letter The Challenge of Peace. I also felt deeply that Desert Storm was portrayed unjustly: as a triumphant exercise of American goodness over the darkest evil and a war that had been cleansed of its violence through “surgical strikes” and “smart bombs.”


Deacon George Dardess, a retired professor, holds a Ph.D. in English literature and an M.A. in theology. He has co-authored three books and written Meeting Islam as a Christian (Paraclete) and Do We Worship the Same God? (St. Anthony Messenger Press). Deacon Dardess is a consultant to the Diocese of Rochester, New York, on interfaith dialogue and on migrant ministry.

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