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A Deacon's Journey Through Islam View Comments
By Deacon George Dardess

Last May at Nazareth College in Pittsford, New York, Deacon George Dardess discussed the
book Reclaiming Beauty for the Good of the World.

Becoming a Roman Catholic deacon led me into Islam—not by embracing Islam itself, but by embracing it as a sign of the Other whom the deacon has come to serve. The path has been so full of surprises that I can truly say, “God writes straight with crooked lines.”

Yet it’s not only as a deacon that I speak of Islam. I also speak of it as an ordinary American who one day realized that he knew nothing about this “foreign” religion: nothing of its holy book, the Quran, nothing of its teachings, the people who embraced it, their languages and cultures or even the countries where Muslims live. For example, I couldn’t at that time have found Iraq on the map.

The change began in February 1991. I had been watching with horror televised reports of our first Iraq war, “Desert Storm.” As a recently baptized (1983) Catholic Christian, I had absorbed Thomas Merton’s writings on nonviolence; I had been inspired by the U.S. bishops’ 1983 pastoral letter The Challenge of Peace. I also felt deeply that Desert Storm was portrayed unjustly: as a triumphant exercise of American goodness over the darkest evil and a war that had been cleansed of its violence through “surgical strikes” and “smart bombs.”

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Deacon George Dardess, a retired professor, holds a Ph.D. in English literature and an M.A. in theology. He has co-authored three books and written Meeting Islam as a Christian (Paraclete) and Do We Worship the Same God? (St. Anthony Messenger Press). Deacon Dardess is a consultant to the Diocese of Rochester, New York, on interfaith dialogue and on migrant ministry.

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Raymond Lull: Raymond worked all his life to promote the missions and died a missionary to North Africa. 
<p>Raymond was born at Palma on the island of Mallorca in the Mediterranean Sea. He earned a position in the king’s court there. One day a sermon inspired him to dedicate his life to working for the conversion of the Muslims in North Africa. He became a Secular Franciscan and founded a college where missionaries could learn the Arabic they would need in the missions. Retiring to solitude, he spent nine years as a hermit. During that time he wrote on all branches of knowledge, a work which earned him the title "Enlightened Doctor." </p><p>Raymond then made many trips through Europe to interest popes, kings and princes in establishing special colleges to prepare future missionaries. He achieved his goal in 1311 when the Council of Vienne ordered the creation of chairs of Hebrew, Arabic and Chaldean at the universities of Bologna, Oxford, Paris and Salamanca. At the age of 79, Raymond went to North Africa in 1314 to be a missionary himself. An angry crowd of Muslims stoned him in the city of Bougie. Genoese merchants took him back to Mallorca, where he died. Raymond was beatified in 1514.</p> American Catholic Blog Let’s not forget these words: The Lord never tires of forgiving us, never. The problem is that we grow tired; we don’t want to ask, we grow tired of asking for forgiveness.

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