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The Screwtape Letters Comes to Life View Comments
By James Breig

TO MILLIONS of 21st-century readers and moviegoers, especially adolescents, C.S. Lewis (1898-1963) might be best known as the creator of the Narnia books, which supplement their collections of Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings volumes. Older adults may remember him for The Screwtape Letters, in which Screwtape, an experienced devil, explains to Wormwood, his nephew and a novice tempter, how best to ensnare his assigned human target.

Even at the age of 70, this novel continues to sell well, thanks in part to a new theatrical version that has played off-Broadway for more than 300 performances, in Chicago (six months) and in Washington, D.C. (10 sold-out weeks). A two-person play with a single speaking role, The Screwtape Letters challenges audiences to look not only outward to the stage but also inward at themselves.

The script “pulls back the veil of the spiritual world that most of us inherently know is there,” says Max McLean, who plays Screwtape as a dapper raptor with a grand goatee, brocade smoking jacket and matching vest, his eyes avidly searching for fresh carrion. “We tend to suppress that world because it’s too powerful, too much to handle,” he told St. Anthony Messenger recently.

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James Breig is a veteran writer for Catholic newspapers, magazines and books. The former editor of The Evangelist, the newspaper of the Diocese of Albany, New York, he now authors a syndicated media column for dozens of Catholic papers. He will have three books published this year: a novel, an examination of animals in the Gospels and a nonfiction book about World War II.

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Martyrdom of John the Baptist: The drunken oath of a king with a shallow sense of honor, a seductive dance and the hateful heart of a queen combined to bring about the martyrdom of John the Baptist. The greatest of prophets suffered the fate of so many Old Testament prophets before him: rejection and martyrdom. The “voice crying in the desert” did not hesitate to accuse the guilty, did not hesitate to speak the truth. But why? What possesses a man that he would give up his very life? 
<p>This great religious reformer was sent by God to prepare the people for the Messiah. His vocation was one of selfless giving. The only power that he claimed was the Spirit of Yahweh. “I am baptizing you with water, for repentance, but the one who is coming after me is mightier than I. I am not worthy to carry his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire” (Matthew 3:11). Scripture tells us that many people followed John looking to him for hope, perhaps in anticipation of some great messianic power. John never allowed himself the false honor of receiving these people for his own glory. He knew his calling was one of preparation. When the time came, he led his disciples to Jesus: “The next day John was there again with two of his disciples, and as he watched Jesus walk by, he said, ‘Behold, the Lamb of God.’ The two disciples heard what he said and followed Jesus” (John 1:35-37). It is John the Baptist who has pointed the way to Christ. John’s life and death were a giving over of self for God and other people. His simple style of life was one of complete detachment from earthly possessions. His heart was centered on God and the call that he heard from the Spirit of God speaking to his heart. Confident of God’s grace, he had the courage to speak words of condemnation or repentance, of salvation.</p> American Catholic Blog Once you begin to neglect obedience, one by one everything goes. Obedience is difficult but that’s where love comes from. There are so many broken families because a woman will not obey a man and a man will not obey a woman. We belong to Jesus and obedience is our strength. You must do small acts of obedience with great love.

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