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Finding St. Anthony: His Art and Miracles View Comments
By Marion Amberg

Santeros Roberto Gonzales and Ernesto Salazar fashioned this bulto (statue) of St. Anthony preaching to the fish.

ST. ANTHONY, please help me find my keys.” “St. Anthony, I lost my job and need to find a new one.” In some regions of the country where St. Anthony is revered as a celestial matchmaker, single women pray, “Oh, lovely St. Anthony, find me a lovely husband.” And if you’re a writer, you might beg the Franciscan saint to help you find the right words!

What reader hasn’t asked St. Anthony of Padua—patron of lost items and many other causes—for help in finding something? But how many of us ever go looking for St. Anthony? If we did, we’d find the friar’s likeness chiseled in stone, painted on murals, carved in wood and etched in stained glass.

He’s seen embracing the Christ Child, preaching to fish or holding a white lily, a symbol of purity. “Tony” even guards the poor box at the Jesuit-run Immaculate Conception Church in New Orleans, Louisiana. The poor box often benefits from the good fortune of bettors at a nearby racetrack.

What do all these artistic renditions have in common? They depict the amazing faith story and intercessory powers of this irresistible and universally loved saint. Come, St. Anthony is waiting to be found—in some very inspiring and miraculous artwork!

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Writing from New Mexico, Marion Amberg researched and composed this story with a statue of St. Anthony—carved from a table leg—at her side.

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Hugh of Grenoble: Today’s saint could be a patron for those of us who feel so overwhelmed by all the problems in the world that we don’t know where to begin. 
<p>Hugh, who served as a bishop in France for 52 years, had his work cut out for him from the start. Corruption seemed to loom in every direction: the buying and selling of Church offices, violations of clerical celibacy, lay control of Church property, religious indifference and/or ignorance. After serving as bishop for two years, he’d had his fill. He tried disappearing to a monastery, but the pope called him back to continue the work of reform. </p><p>Ironically, Hugh was reasonably effective in the role of reformer—surely because of his devotion to the Church but also because of his strong character. In conflicts between Church and state he was an unflinching defender of the Church. He fearlessly supported the papacy. He was eloquent as a preacher. He restored his own cathedral, made civic improvements in the town and weathered a brief exile. </p><p>Hugh may be best known as patron and benefactor of St. Bruno, founder of the Carthusian Order. </p><p>Hugh died in 1132. He was canonized only two years later.</p> American Catholic Blog In our lives, Lord, you make wondrous things happen that deeply impress us; then as time passes, we forget. Father, deepen my faith in you and my trust in your love and care for me, so I may be strong when difficult times occur that will test my love and loyalty to you. I ask for this grace in Jesus's name, Amen.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Wednesday of Holy Week
Today keep in prayer all the priests and ministers throughout the world who will preside at Holy Week services.

Tuesday of Holy Week
While Lent has a penitential character, it is also a time for reflecting on the baptismal commitment we make as Christians.

Monday of Holy Week
Holy Week reminds us of the price Jesus paid for our salvation. Take time for prayer at home and at church.

Palm Sunday
Holy Week services and prayers invite us to follow Jesus into Jerusalem, experiencing the events of his passion and death.

Praying for You
As they grow closer to the Easter sacraments, your parish’s RCIA candidates count on your prayers.


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