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An Unplanned Pilgrimage View Comments
By Jim Brennan

Throughout the year, more than 2 million pilgrims visit the Basilica of Notre Dame de Fourvière in Lyon, France, to entrust to Mary their prayer intentions and to observe the basilica’s stunning architecture.
CHANCES ARE, as many American Catholics associate Notre Dame with a university in South Bend, Indiana, as they do with Our Lady. Some may even wonder why a cathedral in Paris was named after a football team with a fighting leprechaun as a mascot. Fewer still are likely to be familiar with the Basilica of Notre Dame de Fourvière in Lyon, France. Admittedly, I was one of those in the dark until an inadvertent discovery on a recent vacation.

Our adventure started out as planned, with a few days in Paris, visiting many of the popular attractions including the Louvre, Arc de Triomphe, and Luxembourg Gardens. When we arrived at the Cathedral of Notre Dame, it was immediately apparent why it is the most visited site in the city, even outranking the Eiffel Tower. Simply observing the 14th-century cathedral’s twin 228-foot towers— sculpted portals that portray scriptural themes and stained-glass artistry— makes it impossible to imagine a more magnificent structure anywhere on earth. And we hadn’t yet left Paris.

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Jim Brennan writes nonfiction, essays, and short stories from Bucks County, Pennsylvania. His work has appeared in national publications including American Fitness, Inns Magazine, and Senior Living. He blogs about running and healthy lifestyles at rite2run.wordpress.com, and his memoir, Twenty-Four Years to Boston, is planned for spring 2013 publication.

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Apollonia: The persecution of Christians began in Alexandria during the reign of the Emperor Philip. The first victim of the pagan mob was an old man named Metrius, who was tortured and then stoned to death. The second person who refused to worship their false idols was a Christian woman named Quinta. Her words infuriated the mob and she was scourged and stoned. 
<p>While most of the Christians were fleeing the city, abandoning all their worldly possessions, an old deaconess, Apollonia, was seized. The crowds beat her, knocking out all of her teeth. Then they lit a large fire and threatened to throw her in it if she did not curse her God. She begged them to wait a moment, acting as if she was considering their requests. Instead, she jumped willingly into the flames and so suffered martyrdom.</p><p>There were many churches and altars dedicated to her. Apollonia is the patroness of dentists, and people suffering from toothache and other dental diseases often ask her intercession. She is pictured with a pair of pincers holding a tooth or with a golden tooth suspended from her necklace. St. Augustine explained her voluntary martyrdom as a special inspiration of the Holy Spirit, since no one is allowed to cause his or her own death.</p> American Catholic Blog We can find Christ among the despised, voiceless, and forgotten of the world. We have to move beyond that which we wish to ignore and forget about: embrace the seemingly un-embraceable, love the unlovable, and dare to know what we most fear and wish to leave unknowable.

Life's Great Questions

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
St. Valentine's Day
Bring candy and flowers but send an e-card.

Our Lady of Lourdes
Celebrate our Blessed Mother who never tires of interceding on our behalf.

Ash Wednesday
Throughout these 40 days we allow our pride to fade into humility as together we ask for forgiveness.

Mardi Gras
Promise this Lent to do one thing to become more aware of God in yourself and in others.

St. Josephine Bakhita
Today we honor the first saint from the Sudan, who was a model of piety and humility.


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