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God Has a Sense of Humor View Comments
By James Breig

AT 27, WITH A WHARTON SCHOOL OF BUSINESS DEGREE and a job at General Electric, James Martin decided to try something completely different: the priesthood. Ordained a Jesuit in 1999, he is now a prolific author,magazine editor, and media commentator whose elucidations on Church teaching are sought by everyone from newsman Bill O’Reilly of Fox News to satirist Stephen Colbert on the Comedy Central cable channel.

“I began to grow dissatisfied with my job,” Martin says, recalling his decision to leave the corporate world and enter the seminary. “I felt [I was] in the wrong place. One day, I turned on the TV and saw a documentary about Thomas Merton. It just captivated me. Something about the look on his face—a look of serenity—called out to me. That prompted me to read his books, and that started me thinking about doing something else. I always joke that my vocation began with television.”

His coworkers and relatives reacted to his vocation with stunned surprise. “My parents were horrified,” he says. “How could they not be? I just sprang it on them. A few of my friends at work thought I was crazy—literally. One said, ‘You should see a psychologist.’ I said, ‘I already am; that’s how I was helped to make this decision.’ He said, ‘You should see another psychologist!’”

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James Breig has written articles for many Catholic publications and is the author of a new nonfiction book, Searching for Sgt. Bailey: Saluting an Ordinary Soldier of World War II (Park Chase Press, Baltimore).

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Augustine of Hippo: A Christian at 33, a priest at 36, a bishop at 41: Many people are familiar with the biographical sketch of Augustine of Hippo, sinner turned saint. But really to get to know the man is a rewarding experience. 
<p>There quickly surfaces the intensity with which he lived his life, whether his path led away from or toward God. The tears of his mother, the instructions of Ambrose and, most of all, God himself speaking to him in the Scriptures redirected Augustine’s love of life to a life of love. </p><p>Having been so deeply immersed in creature-pride of life in his early days and having drunk deeply of its bitter dregs, it is not surprising that Augustine should have turned, with a holy fierceness, against the many demon-thrusts rampant in his day. His times were truly decadent—politically, socially, morally. He was both feared and loved, like the Master. The perennial criticism leveled against him: a fundamental rigorism. </p><p>In his day, he providentially fulfilled the office of prophet. Like Jeremiah and other greats, he was hard-pressed but could not keep quiet. “I say to myself, I will not mention him,/I will speak in his name no more./But then it becomes like fire burning in my heart,/imprisoned in my bones;/I grow weary holding it in,/I cannot endure it” (Jeremiah 20:9).</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, please fill my heart and soul with the confidence that you will always provide what I need, when I need it, and let me be obedient to you.

The Gospel of John the Gospel of Relationship

 
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