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On Day 4, Jennifer Scroggins travels to Jal El Dib, Lebanon, and meets members of the Franciscan Sisters of the Cross, who minister to the handicapped, the aging, the chronically ill and children.

Special Features
Day 4: Jal El Dib, Lebanon

"Mural of Charism" for the Franciscan Sisters of the Cross. (photo by Jennifer Scroggins)
An autistic child bangs his head against a wall, and a nurse races over to comfort and protect him. A young man with Down syndrome is singing Christmas carols, in November, and one of his caregivers raises her voice to sing along with him, cheering for him as he makes his way through the verses.

Still another boy, who has cerebral palsy and is confined to a wheelchair, shouts and is immediately tended to with gentle hands and a reassuring smile. The sights and sounds of this room are hard to take in —so many children whose futures seem to hold little promise or joy. Yet in this very room, the Franciscan Sisters of the Cross see God made manifest.

“When you serve these children, you serve Jesus Christ,” says Sister Manal Haddad. “I work to make their lives more easy, more happy.”

Sister Manal is one of 250 sisters in this congregation, which has dedicated itself to living the principles of Blessed Father Yaacoub El-Haddad. Father Yaacoub, a Capuchin, founded the group in 1930 with the priorities of caring for elderly priests; serving the handicapped, the aging, the chronically ill, and children; and promoting education. Today his work has resulted in care centers for all of those needs, and the ministry stretches into Jordan, Syria and Egypt.

Sister Manal Haddad. (photo by Jennifer Scroggins)
The institution where Sister Manal works serves about 1,000 patients, including four children who literally were abandoned on the hospital’s doorstep. In a country like Lebanon, where the government makes few, if any, genuine provisions for healthcare and social services, the Franciscans’ work is crucial.

“If each of us serves in our own capability and knowledge, we will contribute to the expansion of the Church,” says Mother Superior Marie Makhlouf, speaking both specifically and universally. “If each one does his own work in honor and good faith, this is the only way to spread the Church.” Mother Marie says the sisters do things “the Father Yaacoub way,” faithfully persevering despite seemingly insurmountable odds.

Caregiver Manoon Sallouh and Michael Lacivita, of CNEWA, talk to 17-year-old Tony, a patient at the center. (photo by Jennifer Scroggins)
Chief among the obstacles? Money. The Lebanese government pays the sisters $15 a day per patient—when the average cost of care is $66 per patient. To make matters worse, the government is typically two or three years behind in its payments. Thus, organizations often are forced to take costly loans to survive in the short term. By the time the government contributes its share of funding, the loan interest and the devaluation of Lebanese currency combine to create an upside-down financial picture.

Yet somehow the Franciscan sisters are thriving. They’ve undertaken an initiative to rehabilitate their Christ the King home for aging priests, relying on divine providence to support the effort and see it to fruition. “God somehow manages,” Mother Marie says.

Though Father Yaacoub died in 1954, his spirit and his vocation of service still permeate the congregation and inform its works. Multiple times, Mother Marie cites Father Yaacoub’s guiding spirituality: To be like a spring, quenching the thirst of all the needy, without asking to what religion or confession someone belongs. “‘My religion is Lebanon,’” Mother Marie says, quoting Father Yaacoub.

Mother Superior Marie Makhlouf explains the mural of charism. (photo by Jennifer Scroggins)
It is clear that St. Francis also is a guiding light of this ministry. As he embraced the leper, so the sisters embrace the patients in their care. For many of the mentally and physically handicapped children, there is no one else to look after them. Of the 62 boys in the mental retardation ward, 32 are completely dependent. Only 10 can speak. Yet Sister Manal sees opportunity when she looks around—she sees a chance to make service more humanistic, and to provide kindness and care to those most in need. She also sees a path for serving as an example. Says Sister Manal: “My hope is that this spirit will be spread and become rooted in the culture.”

Click here for more daily reports from Lebanon.

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John Leonardi: "I am only one person! Why should I do anything? What good would it do?" Today, as in any age, people seem plagued with the dilemma of getting involved. In his own way John Leonardi answered these questions. He chose to become a priest. 
<p>After his ordination, he became very active in the works of the ministry, especially in hospitals and prisons. The example and dedication of his work attracted several young laymen who began to assist him. They later became priests themselves. </p><p>John lived after the Protestant Reformation and the Council of Trent (1545-63). He and his followers projected a new congregation of diocesan priests. For some reason the plan, which was ultimately approved, provoked great political opposition. John was exiled from his home town of Lucca, Italy, for almost the entire remainder of his life. He received encouragement and help from St. Philip Neri, who gave him his lodgings—along with the care of his cat! </p><p>In 1579, John formed the Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, and published a compendium of Christian doctrine that remained in use until the 19th century. </p><p>Father Leonardi and his priests became a great power for good in Italy, and their congregation was confirmed by Pope Clement in 1595. He died at the age of 68 from a disease caught when tending those stricken by the plague. </p><p>By the deliberate policy of the founder, the Clerks Regular of the Mother of God have never had more than 15 churches and today form only a very small congregation.</p> American Catholic Blog Be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. Put on the whole armor of God that you may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil. For we are not contending against flesh and blood, but against the principalities, against the powers, against the world rulers of this present darkness, against the spiritual hosts of wickedness in the heavenly places.

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