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Thanksgiving season is every season for Christians. In fact, the word eucharist comes from the Greek word for “thanksgiving.” In these weeks leading to the Thanksgiving holiday in the United States, enjoy our special feature on some Thanksgiving themes. In this installment, we talk to Amy Heyd, author of "Saints at the Dinner Table."

Special Features
Saints at the Dinner Table


Looking for saints who shared her love of cooking, Amy Heyd discovered several, such as Sts. Margaret and Christine, whom she would like to invite to her house. She writes:
"I realize now more than ever that when I pray to a saint, I need to have some connection with that saint. Because I am a mother of three children and enjoy cooking for my family as well as friends, I thought I would research saints who shared my interest in food and caretaking." (Click here to read the whole article.)


Amy Heyd talks with AmericanCatholic.org about Thanksgiving, food and family gatherings


Why are food and faith so closely linked? Both our body and soul need nourishment. God provides food to nourish our bodies and opportunities for prayer and service to nourish our souls.

What do you, personally, get out of cooking? For me, cooking is a release. It calms me when things feel out of control. If I can control what comes out of the oven it makes it easier for me to give God control of the rest.

Does your family have any Thanksgiving traditions? We move to the living room after dinner and team up to play a mean game of Trivial Pursuit.

What is your favorite Thanksgiving recipe? Definitely my grandmother’s German Sausage dressing. The recipe only calls for five ingredients, but wow, when those ingredients combine together it makes my taste buds shout for joy.

What are you thankful for?
I have been very blessed with a terrific family and great friends.

I don’t like cranberry sauce. Other traditional Thanksgiving sides get old. What other options do I have?
Thanksgiving is so steeped with food traditions you run the risk of starting a riot if you don’t serve the old standbys. Sometimes it is a good idea to try a new twist on an old favorite. I hate cranberry jelly that comes out of a can, but my mom used to make a cranberry relish that was fantastic. The sweet and tart relish is a nice light accent against the heavy Thanksgiving dinner.

What saints—if any—come to mind for you this holiday? St. Francis Xavier is the patron saint of Missionaries. Just like the pilgrims, he spent his life in new lands living in difficult conditions.

Pumpkin pie is a mainstay at Thanksgiving but it can be overplayed. What other desserts do you recommend? My husband is not a huge fan of pumpkin pie, (truth be told, I am not either) so, one year I made a Chocolate Pecan Pie recipe I found in a Pillsbury circular. We loved it! Now every year my husband asks for that pie.

 Do you encourage families to cook together? Why? I encourage spending time with your family. Cooking can be a great way to do that. When my children were younger, we cooked together all of the time. Now that they are older we don’t cook together as much. When we do, the kids usually have some friends over to participate. It has been a great way to spend time with my kids and get to know their friends better.

Any quick-and-easy recipes you’d like to share?
 
Gee’s German Sausage Dressing
3 (24 oz.) packages of Pepperidge Farm white bread
1 (1 lb.) package of mild pork sausage (not sage flavored)
1 ½ cups chopped yellow onion
2 ribs of celery, chopped
1 (49 oz.) can chicken broth
 
Cut the bread into dice size pieces. Ideally the bread should sit out on a cookie sheet overnight to dry out a bit. I don’t always plan that far ahead.  It works fine to cut the bread and then place it into a very large soup pot or bowl. In a large skillet, break up the sausage and cook for 5 – 7 minutes over medium heat until the sausage is fully cooked.  Remove the sausage from the skillet and drain on paper towel. Remove most of the grease from the pan leaving just a little. With the sausage out of the skillet, place the onions and celery in the skillet and cook over medium heat until the onions become soft and translucent. Sprinkle the onions and celery over the bread cubes. Sprinkle the cooked sausage over the bread mixture and stir together. Slowly pour one third of the can of chicken broth over the bread mixture and fully combine. Add the second third (that sounds funny, doesn’t it) of the chicken broth and fully combine.  Spoon the mixture into a 9 x 13 pan. Once the mixture is evenly distributed, pour the final third of the chicken broth over the bread mixture. At this point the dressing can be refrigerated overnight if you desire. Bake the dressing in a 350° oven for 30 minutes.
 
Cranberry relish
 
1 seedless orange
1 (12 oz.) bag cranberries
1 cup sugar
 
Zest the orange and place the zest(the very outer orange part of the orange’s peel) into a food processor.  Remove the bitter pith(the white part of the orange peel) of the orange and then cut the orange into quarters and place into the food processor.  Add the cranberries and the sugar to the food processor and pulse for about one minute.  The cranberries should be processed into small rice size pieces.  Do not pulse into a liquid.  Cover the relish and refrigerate for 24 hours to let the flavors blend.  (This is great because when you are making a Thanksgiving meal the last thing you want to make is one more dish that has to be assembled at the last minute!!)  The relish will last in the refrigerator for two weeks.







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John Bosco: John Bosco’s theory of education could well be used in today’s schools. It was a preventive system, rejecting corporal punishment and placing students in surroundings removed from the likelihood of committing sin. He advocated frequent reception of the sacraments of Penance and Holy Communion. He combined catechetical training and fatherly guidance, seeking to unite the spiritual life with one’s work, study and play. 
<p>Encouraged during his youth to become a priest so he could work with young boys, John was ordained in 1841. His service to young people started when he met a poor orphan and instructed him in preparation for receiving Holy Communion. He then gathered young apprentices and taught them catechism. </p><p>After serving as chaplain in a hospice for working girls, John opened the Oratory of St. Francis de Sales for boys. Several wealthy and powerful patrons contributed money, enabling him to provide two workshops for the boys, shoemaking and tailoring. </p><p>By 1856, the institution had grown to 150 boys and had added a printing press for publication of religious and catechetical pamphlets. His interest in vocational education and publishing justify him as patron of young apprentices and Catholic publishers. </p><p>John’s preaching fame spread and by 1850 he had trained his own helpers because of difficulties in retaining young priests. In 1854 he and his followers informally banded together, inspired by St. Francis de Sales [January 24]. </p><p>With Pope Pius IX’s encouragement, John gathered 17 men and founded the Salesians in 1859. Their activity concentrated on education and mission work. Later, he organized a group of Salesian Sisters to assist girls.</p> American Catholic Blog How do you expect to reach your own perfection by leading someone else’s life? His sanctity will never be yours; you must have the humility to work out your own salvation in a darkness where you are absolutely alone.


 
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