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Thanksgiving season is every season for Christians. In fact, the word eucharist comes from the Greek word for “thanksgiving.” In these weeks leading to the Thanksgiving holiday in the United States, enjoy our special feature on some Thanksgiving themes. We’ll update this feature regularly, with reflections on food, family and faith.

Special Features
Food, Family, Faith


The Freestore Foodbank and the "Cincinnati Cooks" Program

Jennifer Scroggins visits the Cincinnati Freestore Foodbank, a local agency that combats hunger and poverty in several creative ways, including a program to train people for jobs in all aspects of the food service industry. Click here for more.

Grace Before Meals

This month, families across the country will gather around their tables to celebrate Thanksgiving. It is a scene that Father Leo Patalinghug, a priest in the Archdiocese of Baltimore, is trying to get families to recreate the other 364 days of the year. He’s doing that through his Grace Before Meals movement (www.gracebeforemeals.com), which encourages families to prepare and enjoy meals together. Click here for more.

Saints at the Dinner Table

Amy Heyd,author of Saints at the Dinner Table talks with St. Anthony Messenger Assistant Editor Christopher Heffron about Thanksgiving and shares a few favorite family recipes. Click here for more.

Give Us This Day Our Daily Bread


For this installment of our Thanksgiving feature, “Food, Family, Faith,” AmericanCatholic.org traveled just around the corner to Our Daily Bread, a soup kitchen here in Cincinnati’s Over-The-Rhine neighborhood. Click here for more.




Cooking With Father Dominic


In the November 2003 issue of St. Anthony Messenger, Susan Hines-Brigger interviewed Father Dominic Garramone, O.S.B., then the host of the PBS television show Breaking Bread With Father Dominic.

As part of our ongoing Food, Family, Faith special feature here on AmericanCatholic.org, Susan caught up with Father Dominic, who has two recently published books. Here is their conversation.

And just in time for New Year's Eve celebrations, Fr. Dominic shares a recipe for smoked salmon pizza. Click here for more.





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Pierre Toussaint: 
		<p>Born in modern-day Haiti and brought to New York City as a slave, Pierre died a free man, a renowned hairdresser and one of New York City’s most well-known Catholics. <br /><br />Pierre Bérard, a plantation owner, made Toussaint a house slave and allowed his grandmother to teach her grandson how to read and write. In his early 20s, Pierre, his younger sister, his aunt and two other house slaves accompanied their master’s son to New York City because of political unrest at home. Apprenticed to a local hairdresser, Pierre learned the trade quickly and eventually worked very successfully in the homes of rich women in New York City. <br /><br />When his master died, Pierre was determined to support his master’s widow, himself and the other house slaves. He was freed shortly before the widow’s death in 1807. </p>
		<p>Four years later he married Marie Rose Juliette, whose freedom he had purchased. They later adopted Euphémie, his orphaned niece. Both preceded him in death. He attended daily Mass at St. Peter’s Church on Barclay Street, the same parish that St. Elizabeth Seton attended. <br /><br />Pierre donated to various charities, generously assisting blacks and whites in need. He and his wife opened their home to orphans and educated them. The couple also nursed abandoned people who were suffering from yellow fever. Urged to retire and enjoy the wealth he had accumulated, Pierre responded, “I have enough for myself, but if I stop working I have not enough for others.” <br /><br />He was originally buried outside St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral, where he was once refused entrance because of his race. His sanctity and the popular devotion to him caused his body to be moved to St. Patrick’s Cathedral on Fifth Avenue. <br /><br />Pierre Toussaint was declared Venerable in 1996.</p>
American Catholic Blog We have a responsibility to balance the scales, to show love where there is hate, to provide food where there is hunger, and to protect what is vulnerable. If life has treated you well, then justice demands that you help balance the scales.


The Chime Travelers the Sign of the Carved Cross



 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Ven. Pierre Toussaint
This former slave is one of many American holy people whose life particularly models Christian values.

Memorial Day (U.S.)
This weekend remember all those who have fought and died for peace.

Sacrament of the Eucharist
When you are with the bread of life, you don't have to go out and look for food. You already have it in abundance.

Caregiver
Send an encouraging message to someone you know who cares for another, either professionally or at home.

Praying for You
Let your pastor know that you prayed for him today, or that you will pray for him tomorrow.



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