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Learn about the life and legends of St. Patrick. Read how he brought Christianity to Ireland and how you can celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with stories and activities. Also, learn about the history the Celts and Celtic spirituality, and send St. Patrick e-cards.

Seasonal Features
St. Patrick's Day
Send a St. Patrick’s Day e-Greeting!

The St. Patrick You Never Knew

from St. Anthony Messenger
He didn’t chase the snakes out of Ireland and he may never have plucked a shamrock to teach the mystery of the Trinity. Yet, St. Patrick well deserves to be honored by the people of Ireland—and by downtrodden and excluded people everywhere.

Retreat with the Real St. Patrick
from A Retreat With Patrick: Discovering God In All
Discover the simple teaching of St. Patrick, his historical context and his journey through Celtic spirituality.

Journey Into Celtic Spirituality
from St. Anthony Messenger
Learn about the history of the Celts and Celtic spirituality in Ireland, the symbolism of Celtic art, music and literature and the influence of Celtic Christianity in the modern world.

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day as a Family
from St. Anthony Messenger
Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day by learning the legends associated with this Catholic saint, learning about other Irish saints and participating in St. Patrick’s Day activities.

From Slave to Saint: St. Patrick
from American Catholic Radio
Listen to or download an audio clip on St. Patrick provided by American Catholic Radio.

St. Patrick: A Man of Action, Rock-Hard Faith
from Saint of the Day
Read and listen to the story of St. Patrick. Learn about this humble and courageous Catholic saint who brought Christianity to Ireland.

The Real St. Patrick
from Friar Jack’s E-spirations
Examine the real story of St. Patrick, full of adventure, faith and grace, beyond the mythic and cultural trappings of snakes, shamrocks, green beer and corned beef and cabbage.
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Visitation: This is a fairly late feast, going back only to the 13th or 14th century. It was established widely throughout the Church to pray for unity. The present date of celebration was set in 1969 in order to follow the Annunciation of the Lord (March 25) and precede the Nativity of John the Baptist (June 24). 
<p>Like most feasts of Mary, it is closely connected with Jesus and his saving work. The more visible actors in the visitation drama (see Luke 1:39-45) are Mary and Elizabeth. However, Jesus and John the Baptist steal the scene in a hidden way. Jesus makes John leap with joy—the joy of messianic salvation. Elizabeth, in turn, is filled with the Holy Spirit and addresses words of praise to Mary—words that echo down through the ages. </p><p>It is helpful to recall that we do not have a journalist’s account of this meeting. Rather, Luke, speaking for the Church, gives a prayerful poet’s rendition of the scene. Elizabeth’s praise of Mary as “the mother of my Lord” can be viewed as the earliest Church’s devotion to Mary. As with all authentic devotion to Mary, Elizabeth’s (the Church’s) words first praise God for what God has done to Mary. Only secondly does she praise Mary for trusting God’s words. </p><p>Then comes the Magnificat (Luke 1:46-55). Here Mary herself (like the Church) traces all her greatness to God.</p> American Catholic Blog Someone once told Pope Francis that his words had inspired him to give a lot more to the poor. Pope Francis’s response was to challenge the man not to just give money, but to roll up his sleeves, get his hands dirty, and actually reach out and help.

Proclaiming the Gospel of Life by Fr. Frank Pavone

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
The Visitation
Mary’s song of joy on this occasion traces all her blessings to God’s generosity.

St. Joan of Arc
The piety of this 15th-century military heroine was not appreciated until centuries after her death.

Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ
Ultimately it is the Eucharist that feeds us and leads us to the heavenly banquet.

Ven. Pierre Toussaint
This former slave is one of many American holy people whose life particularly models Christian values.

Memorial Day (U.S.)
This weekend remember all those who have fought and died for peace.




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