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Learn about the life and legends of St. Patrick. Read how he brought Christianity to Ireland and how you can celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with stories and activities. Also, learn about the history the Celts and Celtic spirituality, and send St. Patrick e-cards.

Seasonal Features
St. Patrick's Day
Send a St. Patrick’s Day e-Greeting!

The St. Patrick You Never Knew

from St. Anthony Messenger
He didn’t chase the snakes out of Ireland and he may never have plucked a shamrock to teach the mystery of the Trinity. Yet, St. Patrick well deserves to be honored by the people of Ireland—and by downtrodden and excluded people everywhere.

Retreat with the Real St. Patrick
from A Retreat With Patrick: Discovering God In All
Discover the simple teaching of St. Patrick, his historical context and his journey through Celtic spirituality.

Journey Into Celtic Spirituality
from St. Anthony Messenger
Learn about the history of the Celts and Celtic spirituality in Ireland, the symbolism of Celtic art, music and literature and the influence of Celtic Christianity in the modern world.

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day as a Family
from St. Anthony Messenger
Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day by learning the legends associated with this Catholic saint, learning about other Irish saints and participating in St. Patrick’s Day activities.

From Slave to Saint: St. Patrick
from American Catholic Radio
Listen to or download an audio clip on St. Patrick provided by American Catholic Radio.

St. Patrick: A Man of Action, Rock-Hard Faith
from Saint of the Day
Read and listen to the story of St. Patrick. Learn about this humble and courageous Catholic saint who brought Christianity to Ireland.

The Real St. Patrick
from Friar Jack’s E-spirations
Examine the real story of St. Patrick, full of adventure, faith and grace, beyond the mythic and cultural trappings of snakes, shamrocks, green beer and corned beef and cabbage.


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Augustine of Canterbury: In the year 596, some 40 monks set out from Rome to evangelize the Anglo-Saxons in England. Leading the group was Augustine, the prior of their monastery in Rome. Hardly had he and his men reached Gaul (France) when they heard stories of the ferocity of the Anglo-Saxons and of the treacherous waters of the English Channel. Augustine returned to Rome and to the pope who had sent them—St. Gregory the Great (September 3 )—only to be assured by him that their fears were groundless. 
<p>Augustine again set out. This time the group crossed the English Channel and landed in the territory of Kent, ruled by King Ethelbert, a pagan married to a Christian, Bertha. Ethelbert received them kindly, set up a residence for them in Canterbury and within the year, on Pentecost Sunday, 597, was himself baptized. After being consecrated a bishop in France, Augustine returned to Canterbury, where he founded his see. He constructed a church and monastery near where the present cathedral, begun in 1070, now stands. As the faith spread, additional sees were established at London and Rochester. </p><p>Work was sometimes slow and Augustine did not always meet with success. Attempts to reconcile the Anglo-Saxon Christians with the original Briton Christians (who had been driven into western England by Anglo-Saxon invaders) ended in dismal failure. Augustine failed to convince the Britons to give up certain Celtic customs at variance with Rome and to forget their bitterness, helping him evangelize their Anglo-Saxon conquerors </p><p>Laboring patiently, Augustine wisely heeded the missionary principles—quite enlightened for the times—suggested by Pope Gregory the Great: purify rather than destroy pagan temples and customs; let pagan rites and festivals be transformed into Christian feasts; retain local customs as far as possible. The limited success Augustine achieved in England before his death in 605, a short eight years after he arrived in England, would eventually bear fruit long after in the conversion of England. Augustine of Canterbury can truly be called the “Apostle of England.”</p> American Catholic Blog When we go through pain it is easy to feel abandoned or forgotten, but suffering doesn’t mean God doesn’t love us, He does. Even Jesus suffered, and He was completely without sin.

Life's Great Questions

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Congratulations
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Pentecost
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Graduation
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