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Read about Catholic motherhood and the Virgin Mary, Mother of Jesus and Mother of the Church.

Seasonal Features
Mother's Day
Send a Mother's Day e-Greeting!


The Other Mother's Day

Lately I’ve been thinking about the other side of Mother’s Day: the heartbreak. For too many people, this day doesn’t mean corsages, brunches and presents.

Mother’s Day: What Does It Really Mean?

Learn about the roots of Mother's Day, and find ways to celebrate the holiday and to honor mothers throughout the year.
 
Mothers as Nurturers
A major characteristic of mothers is the ability to be nurturing and relational. This excerpt from Awakening to Prayer: A Woman's Perspective describes a way for women to use God's love as a model for nurturing and relating to their families.

Hallmark of a Good Family
Both mothers and fathers often expect to have a picture-perfect family, and struggle with the realization that their own family falls short of the mark. Dr. Ray Guarendi's Adoption: Choosing It, Living It, Loving It contains valuable insights for all families.

I Am the Prodigal Mom
The gospel story of the prodigal son is for parents a perfect example of forgiveness and second chances.

Baby Wanted: The Shrine of Our Lady of La Leche
For many women who make the pilgrimage to the Shrine of Our Lady of La Leche, the Virgin Mary is the “mother of maternal desires.”

The Hardest Part of Being a Mother
Each stage of a child's life presents its own difficulties. None of them is as difficult, as this mom discovered, as letting go.

Saint for Moms and Everyday People
Read about the life and death of St. Gianna Beretta Molla—pediatrician, wife, mother, saint.

Mother’s Day Reflection
Read a Mother's Day reflection from Thresholds to Prayer.

Mother’s Day Prayer
Read a Mother’s Day prayer from Friend Jesus: Prayers for Children.

Learning About Mary
The Church honors the Blessed Virgin during the month of May. Visit our Mary feature to find more Mother’s Day inspiration.

Gifts for Mother’s Day
Your favorite authors, on a wide variety of subjects of interest
especially to women. Select titles also available in audio.


Paid Advertisement
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Peter Canisius: The energetic life of Peter Canisius should demolish any stereotypes we may have of the life of a saint as dull or routine. Peter lived his 76 years at a pace which must be considered heroic, even in our time of rapid change. A man blessed with many talents, Peter is an excellent example of the scriptural man who develops his talents for the sake of the Lord’s work. 
<p>He was one of the most important figures in the Catholic Reformation in Germany. His was such a key role that he has often been called the “second apostle of Germany” in that his life parallels the earlier work of Boniface (June 5). </p><p>Although Peter once accused himself of idleness in his youth, he could not have been idle too long, for at the age of 19 he received a master’s degree from the university at Cologne. Soon afterwards he met Peter Faber, the first disciple of Ignatius Loyola (July 31), who influenced Peter so much that he joined the recently formed Society of Jesus. </p><p>At this early age Peter had already taken up a practice he continued throughout his life—a process of study, reflection, prayer and writing. After his ordination in 1546, he became widely known for his editions of the writings of St. Cyril of Alexandria and St. Leo the Great. Besides this reflective literary bent, Peter had a zeal for the apostolate. He could often be found visiting the sick or prisoners, even when his assigned duties in other areas were more than enough to keep most people fully occupied. </p><p>In 1547 Peter attended several sessions of the Council of Trent, whose decrees he was later assigned to implement. After a brief teaching assignment at the Jesuit college at Messina, Peter was entrusted with the mission to Germany—from that point on his life’s work. He taught in several universities and was instrumental in establishing many colleges and seminaries. He wrote a catechism that explained the Catholic faith in a way which common people could understand—a great need of that age. </p><p>Renowned as a popular preacher, Peter packed churches with those eager to hear his eloquent proclamation of the gospel. He had great diplomatic ability, often serving as a reconciler between disputing factions. In his letters (filling eight volumes) one finds words of wisdom and counsel to people in all walks of life. At times he wrote unprecedented letters of criticism to leaders of the Church—yet always in the context of a loving, sympathetic concern. </p><p>At 70 Peter suffered a paralytic seizure, but he continued to preach and write with the aid of a secretary until his death in his hometown (Nijmegen, Netherlands) on December 21, 1597.</p> American Catholic Blog While we await the full and unending experience of God drawing near to us, we must continue to work in the vineyard. We must continue to make God’s love real in every condition and circumstance of our lives.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Sisterhood of Saints
Enjoy a daily dose of guidance and inspiration from widely known female saints such as Sts. Monica, Teresa of Avila, Thérèse of Lisieux, Joan, and Bernadette.
New from Richard Rohr
"This Franciscan message is sorely needed in the world...." —Publishers Weekly
Who Inspired Thomas Merton?
Learn new ways of living in harmony with God, creation, and others, courtesy of St. Francis and Thomas Merton.
A New Daily Devotional for 2015
"A practical and appealing daily guide to the Poor Man of Assisi." —Margaret Carney, O.S.F., president, St. Bonaventure University
Celebrate the Centenary of Thomas Merton's birth
One of Merton's most enduring and popular works, now in audio!

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Fourth Sunday of Advent - "O Antiphons"
"Come, O Radiant Dawn" Before dinner this evening gather your family around the Advent wreath and light all four candles.
Fourth Sunday of Advent - "O Antiphons"
“Come, O Key of David” Before dinner this evening gather your family around the Advent wreath and light all four candles.
Advent - "O Antiphons"
“Come, O Root of Jesse” Christmas is less than a week away! Take time now to schedule e-cards for a later delivery.
Advent - "O Antiphons"
“Come, O Lord” Send an e-card to celebrate the third week of Advent.
Advent - "O Antiphons"
“Come, O Wisdom” The liturgical countdown to Christmas begins today.



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