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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Planes: Fire & Rescue

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


Animated characters appear in the movie "Planes: Fire & Rescue."
Anthropomorphic aircraft take to the skies again in "Planes: Fire & Rescue" (Disney), a lively follow-up to last summer's franchise kickoff, "Planes."

Directed by Roberts Gannaway from a screenplay by returning writer Jeffrey M. Howard, "Planes: Fire & Rescue" is that rare sequel which surpasses the original in action, adventure, and 3-D animation. That last element is especially vivid and immersive. In fact, the looping aerial scenes may even make some viewers queasy.

The humanless universe that originated with the "Cars" film series is cleverly expanded, with new autos, boats and trains joining the fun.

Amid the many sight gags and puns, there's a positive message about personal sacrifice on behalf of those in need, expressed by the fearless air-attack teams and smoke jumpers battling fires deep in the California forest.

Picking up where "Planes" left off, the sequel finds Dusty Crophopper (voice of Dane Cook), the humble cropduster-turned-racing-champion central to the first movie, an international celebrity. Life is good, until an accident reveals a deadly secret: Dusty's gearbox is failing.

For a racer, this spells doom. Unless Dusty slows down, he may never fly again.

An opportunity to switch gears -- and careers -- arises in Piston Peak National Park. There an elite firefighting crew, led by veteran rescue helicopter Blade Ranger (voice of Ed Harris), is dedicated to protecting the forest -- and the tourists who frequent a new hotel, the Grand Fusel Lodge.

Assisting Dusty in his training regimen are Lil' Dipper (voice of Julie Bowen), a love-struck "super-scooper" aircraft (which carries water or flame retardant), and Windlifter (voice of Wes Studi), a heavy-lift helicopter who serves as the park's resident sage.

When a major fire burns out of control and threatens the hotel, Dusty is put to the ultimate test and witnesses true heroism in action.

Some of the nail-biting action scenes in "Planes: Fire & Rescue" may be a bit intense for the youngest viewers. Additionally, a few double entendres -- presumably aimed at adults -- may raise concerns for parents. While these one-liners are likely to pass at an elevation well above kids' heads, their slightly incongruous presence precludes endorsement for all.

Adults, on the other hand, will appreciate the cameo voices and inside jokes. As one depressed car says to a hotel bartender, "She left me for a hybrid. I didn't even hear him coming."

Blade Ranger's backstory includes being the star of a cult television series called "CHoPs," short for California Helicopter Patrol, a riff on the 1977-83 television series "CHiPs." His TV sidekick, Nick "Loop'n" Lopez, is voiced by none other than Erik Estrada, the original "Ponch" of "ChiPs."

The film contains a few perilous situations and some mildly suggestive humor. The Catholic News Service classification is A-II -- adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG -- parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

*****
Joseph McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Peter Chrysologus: A man who vigorously pursues a goal may produce results far beyond his expectations and his intentions. Thus it was with Peter of the Golden Words, as he was called, who as a young man became bishop of Ravenna, the capital of the empire in the West. 
<p>At the time there were abuses and vestiges of paganism evident in his diocese, and these he was determined to battle and overcome. His principal weapon was the short sermon, and many of them have come down to us. They do not contain great originality of thought. They are, however, full of moral applications, sound in doctrine and historically significant in that they reveal Christian life in fifth-century Ravenna. So authentic were the contents of his sermons that, some 13 centuries later, he was declared a doctor of the Church by Pope Benedict XIII. He who had earnestly sought to teach and motivate his own flock was recognized as a teacher of the universal Church. </p><p>In addition to his zeal in the exercise of his office, Peter Chrysologus was distinguished by a fierce loyalty to the Church, not only in its teaching, but in its authority as well. He looked upon learning not as a mere opportunity but as an obligation for all, both as a development of God-given faculties and as a solid support for the worship of God. </p><p>Some time before his death, St. Peter returned to Imola, his birthplace, where he died around A.D. 450.</p> American Catholic Blog Just as Jesus resolutely traveled to Jerusalem, knowing that crucifixion awaited him, we know that we need to seek God’s will and embrace God’s support in all situations—even the necessarily painful ones.

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