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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Ida

By
Kurt Jensen
Source: Catholic News Service


Agata Trzebuchowska stars in a scene from the movie "Ida."
The starkly beautiful minimalist masterpiece that is "Ida" (Music Box) adroitly navigates two horrific eras of Polish history as an aspiring nun discovers her true identity.

While brisk and unadorned at a brief 80 minutes, the film is nevertheless anything but simplistic. Director and co-writer (with Rebecca Lenkiewicz) Pawel Pawlikowski assumes that the audience knows something of the Holocaust in Poland, and of the Stalinist show trials to consolidate state power that followed the Soviet victory in World War II.

The story, set in a dismally cold 1962, has Anna (Agata Trzebuchowska), an 18-year-old novice, about to take her vows. Her mother superior (Halina Skoczynska) summons Anna and tells her that she must first visit her Aunt Wanda (Agata Kulesza), her only living relative. Mother does not indicate what Anna can expect to learn from the encounter.

The life of the convent is the only existence Anna has ever known, since she was left there as an infant.

Wanda, a gruff, hard-drinking, chain-smoking former state prosecutor, wastes no time: "You're Jewish," she tells Anna as the two sit together at Wanda's kitchen table.

Anna's real name, Wanda explains, is Ida Lebenstein, and her parents were killed in a forest by people who were supposedly hiding them from the German invaders.

Brought up to be obedient, Anna/Ida takes all this in with a surprisingly calm air. She asks Wanda to help her find out more about what happened to her parents and their farm. Armed with her natural tenacity and -- as a communist insider -- with the rare luxury of a car, Wanda agrees.

What ensues is a road trip marked by Wanda's constant boozing, the pettiness of local authorities, and the dim atmosphere of a hotel jazz club where Ida eventually breaks out of her shell via a furtive romance with saxophonist Lis (Dawid Ogrodnik).

Complicating the search, her parents' farm is now owned by a family of Catholics who at first retort to Ida's inquiries, "No Jews ever lived here." At the same time, though, they ask Ida to bless their infant child.

Similar contradictions characterize the interaction between atheist Wanda and her believing niece. "What if you go there (i.e., her parents' former home) and discover there is no God?" she asks Ida early on. Later, returning from a night of dissolute partying to find Ida absorbed in prayer, Wanda snorts, "This Jesus of yours died for people like me!"

Wanda can't see what the church offers Ida, but the script doesn't necessarily support her view. Rather, it depicts Ida as a girl getting a late start on life, and her mother superior comes off as very wise for insisting that she see her aunt.

The tragic reality that Catholics participated in the slaughter of Jews is not concealed. But it's also shown that Stalinist Jews killed innocents as well.

A particularly touching scene has Wanda arranging, as a family tree, old photographs of relatives, presumably all victims of the Holocaust. Among the photos is one of Irena Sendler, the real-life Catholic nurse responsible for smuggling 2,500 Jewish children out of Poland.

In keeping with the complexities of the history with which he deals, Pawlikowski leaves his beautifully photographed film deliberately open-ended.

In Polish. Subtitles.

The film contains implied nonmarital sexual activity, a suicide and fleeting crass language. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
Kurt Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Maria Goretti: One of the largest crowds ever assembled for a canonization—250,000—symbolized the reaction of millions touched by the simple story of Maria Goretti. 
<p>She was the daughter of a poor Italian tenant farmer, had no chance to go to school, never learned to read or write. When she made her First Communion not long before her death at age 12, she was one of the larger and somewhat backward members of the class. </p><p>On a hot afternoon in July, Maria was sitting at the top of the stairs of her house, mending a shirt. She was not quite 12 years old, but physically mature. A cart stopped outside, and a neighbor, Alessandro, 18 years old, ran up the stairs. He seized her and pulled her into a bedroom. She struggled and tried to call for help. “No, God does not wish it," she cried out. "It is a sin. You would go to hell for it.” Alessandro began striking at her blindly with a long dagger. </p><p>She was taken to a hospital. Her last hours were marked by the usual simple compassion of the good—concern about where her mother would sleep, forgiveness of her murderer (she had been in fear of him, but did not say anything lest she cause trouble to his family) and her devout welcoming of Viaticum, her last Holy Communion. She died about 24 hours after the attack. </p><p>Her murderer was sentenced to 30 years in prison. For a long time he was unrepentant and surly. One night he had a dream or vision of Maria, gathering flowers and offering them to him. His life changed. When he was released after 27 years, his first act was to go to beg the forgiveness of Maria’s mother. </p><p>Devotion to the young martyr grew, miracles were worked, and in less than half a century she was canonized. At her beatification in 1947, her mother (then 82), two sisters and a brother appeared with Pope Pius XII on the balcony of St. Peter’s. Three years later, at her canonization, a 66-year-old Alessandro Serenelli knelt among the quarter-million people and cried tears of joy.</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, may the medals we wear be constant reminders of the lives they depict. While wearing them, may we be blessed through the saints’ intercession and protected from harm. Help us to continue to spread the messages of Jesus and Mary and the saints and angels.

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