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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Blended

By
Kurt Jensen
Source: Catholic News Service


Drew Barrymore and Adam Sandler star in a scene from the movie "Blended."
"Blended" (Warner Bros.) is that rarity of rarities, a sincere family film, and since it stars Adam Sandler, whose trademark is scatological gags, it's more than a bit of a surprise.

At the same time, director Frank Coraci and screenwriters Ivan Menchell and Clare Sera hew to a rigid formula now common for the genre: Each child's problem is dealt with individually and completely, without condescension.

There's an exotic element, too, with blended families developing bonds at a high-end safari resort in South Africa. And there's even an old-fashioned approach about sons needing fathers to teach them lessons about toughness, and daughters needing a mother's uniquely compassionate understanding.

Sandler is the widowed Jim, manager of a sporting-goods store, with daughters Hillary, Espn (pronounced Espin, and yes, named after the cable-sports network) and Lou (Bella Thorne, Emma Fuhrmann and Alyvia Alyn Lind, respectively). Barrymore is the divorced Lauren, a professional closet organizer with sons Brendan and Tyler (Braxton Beckham and Kyle Red Silverstein).

Through a mutual acquaintance's temporary breakup, they both finagle the same South African getaway for their families. Hilarity usually ensues under such circumstances, but instead, Jim and Lauren quickly rise to the tasks of dealing with their children's issues, which include the normal physical changes for adolescents.

Such matters are dealt with forthrightly, without descending into any crude remarks. Life is dealt with as it occurs. Mature adolescents shouldn't have trouble with any of this. The script strains not to offend.

From time to time, a South African male chorus led by Nickens (Terry Crews) pops up to lend amusing commentary. It's all in good fun, and serves as counterpoint to the two families' most awkward moments.

Toward the end of the story, Jim and Lauren's budding romance takes an unexpectedly serious twist involving her ex-husband, Mark (Joel McHale), which keeps matters firmly anchored and away from cliches.

The film contains frank mentions of bodily functions, light sexual banter and fleeting crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is A-II—adults and adolescents. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
Kurt Jensen is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.





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Martha: Martha, Mary and their brother Lazarus were evidently close friends of Jesus. He came to their home simply as a welcomed guest, rather than as one celebrating the conversion of a sinner like Zacchaeus or one unceremoniously received by a suspicious Pharisee. The sisters feel free to call on Jesus at their brother’s death, even though a return to Judea at that time seems almost certain death. 
<p>No doubt Martha was an active sort of person. On one occasion (see Luke 10:38-42) she prepares the meal for Jesus and possibly his fellow guests and forthrightly states the obvious: All hands should pitch in to help with the dinner. </p><p>Yet, as biblical scholar Father John McKenzie points out, she need not be rated as an “unrecollected activist.” The evangelist is emphasizing what our Lord said on several occasions about the primacy of the spiritual: “...[D]o not worry about your life, what you will eat [or drink], or about your body, what you will wear…. But seek first the kingdom [of God] and his righteousness” (Matthew 6:25b, 33a); “One does not live by bread alone” (Luke 4:4b); “Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for righteousness…” (Matthew 5:6a). </p><p>Martha’s great glory is her simple and strong statement of faith in Jesus after her brother’s death. “Jesus told her, ‘I am the resurrection and the life; whoever believes in me, even if he dies, will live, and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die. Do you believe this?’ She said to him, ‘Yes, Lord. I have come to believe that you are the Messiah, the Son of God, the one who is coming into the world’” (John 11:25-27).</p> American Catholic Blog Anger and inconsistency feed each other. Anger in a parent can lead to erratic discipline, and erratic discipline promotes anger and frustration. Good parents work hard to discipline with a level head. The best parents though, even after many years or many kids, are still working on the level-headed part.

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