AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Winter's Tale

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Jessica Brown Findlay and Colin Farrell star in a scene from the movie "Winter's Tale."
What are some insights moviegoers will gain by viewing the sappy supernatural love story "Winter's Tale" (Warner Bros.)?

That the souls of the deceased become stars, that everybody is destined to achieve a miracle and that, if you're lucky, a snow-white flying horse will appear on the scene just when you need his services most.

That's what happens to the film's protagonist, Peter Lake (Colin Farrell). But then again, Peter's life has been rather unusual from the start: When his immigrant parents were turned away from America's shores for flunking the medical exam at Ellis Island, they did their best to secure their infant son's future by setting him adrift in a miniature boat on the waters of New York Harbor.

Did baby Peter's craft capsize into the polluted waves? Of course not, because the movie's version of early 20th-century Gotham is a fantastical place where such un-poetic events are verboten.

Flash-forward a couple of decades and circumstances have forced grown-up Peter, a would-be mechanic, to turn thief. Worse yet, he's on the run from his former mentor, demonic crime lord Pearly Soames (Russell Crowe). But no sooner do Pearly and his gang of thugs have Peter cornered, than his personal Pegasus appears for the first time and whisks him to safety. Equus ex machina, as it were.

It's no wonder that Peter is soon letting the steed guide his burglarizing choices. And a good thing too, as this leads him to the Fifth Avenue home of newspaper magnate Isaac Penn (William Hurt), where his larceny is interrupted by the unexpected presence in the house of Isaac's sequestered invalid of a daughter, comely but consumptive Beverly (Jessica Brown Findlay).

Peter only has to take a single gander at Beverly—and overhear her playing Brahms on the pianoforte—to know she's The One. Fortunately for him, brink-of-the-grave Beverley turns out to be rather unflappable. So much so that, in a trice, she's offering the Irish-accented intruder a nice cup of tea. Quite hospitable, given the circumstances.

On the subject of that brogue, which the County Dublin-born Ferrell certainly comes by honestly, precisely how Peter should have acquired it is a bit of a mystery. The opening scenes suggest his mom and dad hailed from Russia, while a cameo by Graham Greene in the approximate persona of Peter's foster father indicates that he was raised by Native Americans.

Perhaps he picked it up listening to John McCormack records?

Be that as it may, pity our poor unlikely couple. Not only is the Grim Reaper out to thwart their bliss; Pearly is too. Most decidedly opposed to all forms of happiness is scar-faced Pearly. And he's got himself no lesser an ally in his down-with-smiles crusade than Satan (played by a very familiar but jaw-droppingly miscast star).

The nature of the picture's source material invites speculation about what went wrong, more generally, on the way to the big screen. All audience members who haven't read Helprin's book may know for sure is that the characters in writer-director Akiva Goldsman's adaptation of it spout sentimental twaddle. They also subscribe to a version of metaphysics that might have been lifted from a Hallmark greeting card.

Feverish romanticism and the exaltation of erotic love pave the way to a scene glamorizing an objectively sinful bedroom encounter. Taken together with the script's surfeit of noncommittal navel-gazing—do we become stars after one lifetime or a thousand?—as well as the additional elements listed below, that interlude of lush carnality marks "Winter's Tale" as unsuitable for youngsters.

The film contains some harsh but bloodless violence, semi-graphic premarital sexual activity, brief partial nudity, a couple of uses of profanity and at least one instance each of crude and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Jerome: Most of the saints are remembered for some outstanding virtue or devotion which they practiced, but Jerome is frequently remembered for his bad temper! It is true that he had a very bad temper and could use a vitriolic pen, but his love for God and his Son Jesus Christ was extraordinarily intense; anyone who taught error was an enemy of God and truth, and St. Jerome went after him or her with his mighty and sometimes sarcastic pen. 
<p>He was above all a Scripture scholar, translating most of the Old Testament from the Hebrew. He also wrote commentaries which are a great source of scriptural inspiration for us today. He was an avid student, a thorough scholar, a prodigious letter-writer and a consultant to monk, bishop and pope. St. Augustine (August 28) said of him, "What Jerome is ignorant of, no mortal has ever known." </p><p>St. Jerome is particularly important for having made a translation of the Bible which came to be called the Vulgate. It is not the most critical edition of the Bible, but its acceptance by the Church was fortunate. As a modern scholar says, "No man before Jerome or among his contemporaries and very few men for many centuries afterwards were so well qualified to do the work." The Council of Trent called for a new and corrected edition of the Vulgate, and declared it the authentic text to be used in the Church. </p><p>In order to be able to do such work, Jerome prepared himself well. He was a master of Latin, Greek, Hebrew and Chaldaic. He began his studies at his birthplace, Stridon in Dalmatia (in the former Yugoslavia). After his preliminary education he went to Rome, the center of learning at that time, and thence to Trier, Germany, where the scholar was very much in evidence. He spent several years in each place, always trying to find the very best teachers. He once served as private secretary of Pope Damasus (December 11).</p><p>After these preparatory studies he traveled extensively in Palestine, marking each spot of Christ's life with an outpouring of devotion. Mystic that he was, he spent five years in the desert of Chalcis so that he might give himself up to prayer, penance and study. Finally he settled in Bethlehem, where he lived in the cave believed to have been the birthplace of Christ. On September 30 in the year 420, Jerome died in Bethlehem. The remains of his body now lie buried in the Basilica of St. Mary Major in Rome.</p> American Catholic Blog O fire of love! Was it not enough to gift us with creation in your image and likeness, and to create us anew to grace in your Son’s blood, without giving us yourself as food, the whole of divine being, the whole of God? What drove you? Nothing but your charity, mad with love as your are! –St. Catherine of Siena

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Fearless
Learn about the saints of America: missionaries, martyrs, bishops, heiresses, nuns, and natives who gave their lives to build our Church and our country.
New from Richard Rohr!
"This Franciscan message is sorely needed in the world...." -- Publishers Weekly
New from Servant!
"The saints are our role models...companions for a journey that can be daunting and perilous but also filled with infinite blessings." — Lisa M. Hendey, Foreword
Catholics, Wake Up!

New from Servant! “A total spiritual knockout!” – Fr. Donald Calloway

Adventures in Assisi
“I highly recommend this charming book for every Christian family, school, and faith formation library.” – Donna Marie Cooper O’Boyle, EWTN host

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Happy Birthday
Catholic Greetings Premium Service offers blank e-cards for most occasions.
Sts. Michael, Gabriel, and Raphael, Archangels
Know someone named for one of the archangels? Send a name day e-card today to celebrate their feast.
St. Francis
People around the world find their spirituality enhanced through studying the life of this humble man.
St. Vincent de Paul
Send an e-card to show your appreciation for Vincent's followers, who give aid to our neighbors in distress.
Pet Blessings
The custom of offering a blessing on animals is done in remembrance of St. Francis of Assisi’s love for all creatures.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2014