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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Nebraska

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


Bob Odenkirk, Tim Driscoll, Devin Ratray and June Squibb star in a scene from the movie "Nebraska."
Never underestimate the restorative power of a road trip. That's one of the messages of the comedy and drama blend "Nebraska" (Paramount Vantage).

This quiet, unassuming, yet in part delightful film tackles a big issue—caring for elderly parents—with realism and sensitivity. Even as it celebrates familial love, respect and understanding, however, screenwriter Bob Nelson's script also includes material that makes this journey through the heartland an unsuitable outing for most viewers.

Director Alexander Payne ("The Descendants") made a wise decision to shoot his picture in black and white. The result is a canvas both stark and rich, a study in contrasts which suits the combative family relationships on display.

Woody (Bruce Dern), the grizzled and frail patriarch, receives a sweepstakes solicitation in the mail offering a "prize" of $1 million, to be collected in person in Lincoln, Neb. That's a long way from his home in Montana, but Woody is convinced he's a winner.

Unable to drive, showing signs of dementia, and an alcoholic to boot, Woody sets out on foot, much to the consternation of his overbearing wife, Kate (June Squibb). She sides with one of her sons, Ross (Bob Odenkirk), in deciding that it's time for Woody to be committed to an institution.

Her other son, David (Will Forte), is much more sympathetic. "Dad doesn't need a nursing home," he tells Ross. "He needs something to live for."

As crazy as it sounds, David consents to drive his father to Lincoln to collect his "winnings." For David, it's a change of pace from his mundane existence as a salesman, and an opportunity to mend fences with his estranged father. That's easier said than done, given Woody's short attention span and fondness for disappearing in search of beer.

An extended pit stop brings the duo to Woody's hometown, now much changed. Enter the dotty extended family, including Woody's brother, Ray (Rance Howard), Ray's wife, Martha (Mary Louise Wilson), and their devious grown boys, Bart (Tim Driscoll) and Cole (Devin Ratray).

Before long, Woody reveals his status as a supposed millionaire. This makes him the hometown hero, and soon all of his old "friends" come calling, hoping to share in his good fortune. Among them is Woody's former business partner Ed (Stacy Keach), who's looking to settle a few scores.

"Nebraska" takes its good time, inviting the audience to savor the hard-bitten slice of middle America on display, warts and all. Amid the salty language and bawdy humor, there are some positive core values and good people on display, the latter too often obscured by the few bad eggs.

The film contains frequent profane and crude language, some sexual references and innuendoes and a few jokes directed at Catholics. The Catholic News Service classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
Joseph McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Anselm: Indifferent toward religion as a young man, Anselm became one of the Church's greatest theologians and leaders. He received the title "Father of Scholasticism" for his attempt to analyze and illumine the truths of faith through the aid of reason. 
<p>At 15, Anselm wanted to enter a monastery, but was refused acceptance because of his father's opposition. Twelve years later, after careless disinterest in religion and years of worldly living, he finally fulfilled his desire to be a monk. He entered the monastery of Bec in Normandy, three years later was elected prior and 15 years later was unanimously chosen abbot. </p><p>Considered an original and independent thinker, Anselm was admired for his patience, gentleness and teaching skill. Under his leadership, the abbey of Bec became a monastic school, influential in philosophical and theological studies. </p><p>During these years, at the community's request, Anselm began publishing his theological works, comparable to those of St. Augustine (August 28). His best-known work is the book <i>Cur Deus Homo</i> ("Why God Became Man"). </p><p>At 60, against his will, Anselm was appointed archbishop of Canterbury in 1093. His appointment was opposed at first by England's King William Rufus and later accepted. Rufus persistently refused to cooperate with efforts to reform the Church. </p><p>Anselm finally went into voluntary exile until Rufus died in 1100. He was then recalled to England by Rufus's brother and successor, Henry I. Disagreeing fearlessly with Henry over the king's insistence on investing England's bishops, Anselm spent another three years in exile in Rome. </p><p>His care and concern extended to the very poorest people; he opposed the slave trade. Anselm obtained from the national council at Westminster the passage of a resolution prohibiting the sale of human beings.</p> American Catholic Blog When we have joy in the hour of humiliation, then we are truly humble after the heart of Jesus.

 
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