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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Blue Jasmine

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


Cate Blanchett and Alec Baldwin star in a scene from the movie "Blue Jasmine."

At his best, Woody Allen is a brilliant writer-director of comedic films as insightful as they are hilarious. But in his latest venture, "Blue Jasmine" (Sony Classics), Allen turns the lights down low, presenting the dark and depressing tale of a crazed woman whose life is spiraling out of control. The grim tone comes as no real surprise, though, since Allen's inspiration here is Tennessee Williams' classic play "A Streetcar Named Desire."

Thus his title character, played by Cate Blanchett, experiences a decline that parallels the deterioration of Williams' doomed heroine Blanche DuBois. Unfortunately, despite a bravura performance by Blanchett, "Blue Jasmine" misfires by trying to derive most of its humor from Jasmine's mental illness -- anything but a laughing matter.

In a story that might have been ripped from the headlines, Jasmine is a Park Avenue socialite fallen on hard times. She had no idea her high-rolling financier husband, Hal (Alec Baldwin), was both a philanderer and a fraud. Hal's Ponzi-like scheme, which destroyed the fortunes of his investors, has landed him in prison and Jasmine on the street. Already delusional and an alcoholic, she suffers a nervous breakdown. With nowhere to turn, Jasmine heads west for San Francisco, to move in with her sister Ginger (Sally Hawkins). It's a risky choice, as Ginger and her ex-husband, Augie (Andrew Dice Clay), invested in Hal's enterprise and lost their life savings, which in turn destroyed their marriage.

To Ginger's credit, she puts familial bonds above past hurts, and shelters Jasmine. But Jasmine's gratitude quickly turns to disgust. She's repelled by Ginger's middle-class lifestyle and, especially, by her beefy mechanic boyfriend, Chili (Bobby Cannavale). As she descends into madness on a diet of vodka and Xanax, Jasmine strikes out in all directions. She makes a stab at self-improvement, taking a receptionist job and computer classes. She also decides to remake Ginger's seemingly happy life, encouraging her to dump Chili and seek a "better" match in respectable salesman Al (Louis C.K.) -- with disastrous results. But Jasmine is not made for hard labor or study, only for shallow appearances.

She finds a potential means of escape in Dwight (Peter Sarsgaard), a wealthy diplomat with political ambitions. Jasmine puts on a good show, concealing her past while presenting herself as an ideal and sophisticated partner. She comes close to pulling it off. In the end, "Blue Jasmine" plays the selfish card. It's every character for him- or herself, seemingly without concern for the welfare of others, least of all Jasmine.

The film contains cohabitation, implied nonmarital sexual activity, an adultery theme and much profane and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is L -- limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 -- parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
Joseph McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Th&eacute;r&egrave;se of Lisieux: "I prefer the monotony of obscure sacrifice to all ecstasies. To pick up a pin for love can convert a soul." These are the words of Thérèse of the Child Jesus, a Carmelite nun called the "Little Flower," who lived a cloistered life of obscurity in the convent of Lisieux, France. (In French-speaking areas, she is known as Thérèse of Lisieux.) And her preference for hidden sacrifice did indeed convert souls. Few saints of God are more popular than this young nun. Her autobiography, <i>The Story of a Soul</i>, is read and loved throughout the world. Thérèse Martin entered the convent at the age of 15 and died in 1897 at the age of 24. She was canonized in 1925, and two years later she and St. Francis Xavier were declared co-patrons of the missions. 
<p>Life in a Carmelite convent is indeed uneventful and consists mainly of prayer and hard domestic work. But Thérèse possessed that holy insight that redeems the time, however dull that time may be. She saw in quiet suffering redemptive suffering, suffering that was indeed her apostolate. Thérèse said she came to the Carmel convent "to save souls and pray for priests." And shortly before she died, she wrote: "I want to spend my heaven doing good on earth." </p><p>On October 19, 1997, Saint John Paul II proclaimed her a Doctor of the Church, the third woman to be so recognized, in light of her holiness and the influence on the Church of her teaching on spirituality. Her parents, Louis and Zélie were beatified in 2008.</p> American Catholic Blog How glorious, how holy and wonderful it is to have a Father in Heaven.

 
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