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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

A Good Day to Die Hard

By
Adam Shaw
Source: Catholic News Service


Jai Courtney and Bruce Willis star in a scene from the movie "A Good Day to Die Hard."
The quarter-century-old action franchise that started with 1988's "Die Hard" seems to have reached its own death throes with "A Good Day to Die Hard" (Fox). This fifth installment rests on the premise that killing can be an awful lot of fun.

New York detective and series protagonist John McClane (Bruce Willis) is on the trail of his son Jack (Jai Courtney) who appears to have gotten in with the wrong crowd in Moscow. Things in Mother Russia are not what they seem, however, and an explosives-ridden car chase reveals that the elder McClane has underestimated his offspring.

Mostly reconciled, despite some lingering resentment, Dad and Junior team up to protect a government whistleblower named Komarov (Sebastian Koch) from a variety of villains. In the process, of course, they kick up just the kind of carnage that made the quartet of earlier flicks box-office gold.

In a misguided attempt to keep the proceedings light-hearted, director John Moore presents a jaunty view of bloodletting. And, on occasion, he invites the audience to revel in the mayhem; slow-motion death scenes make an obvious appeal to moviegoers' basest, most visceral instincts.

The rudimentary efforts at character development in Skip Woods' screenplay, meanwhile, are drowned amidst a murky tide of run-and-gun action.

The film contains constant violence, some of it gory, occasional profanity, frequent rough and crude language and two obscene gestures. The Catholic News Service classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
Adam Shaw is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.





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Joachim and Anne: In the Scriptures, Matthew and Luke furnish a legal family history of Jesus, tracing ancestry to show that Jesus is the culmination of great promises. Not only is his mother’s family neglected, we also know nothing factual about them except that they existed. Even the names <i>Joachim</i> and <i>Anne</i> come from a legendary source written more than a century after Jesus died. 
<p>The heroism and holiness of these people, however, is inferred from the whole family atmosphere around Mary in the Scriptures. Whether we rely on the legends about Mary’s childhood or make guesses from the information in the Bible, we see in her a fulfillment of many generations of prayerful persons, herself steeped in the religious traditions of her people. </p><p>The strong character of Mary in making decisions, her continuous practice of prayer, her devotion to the laws of her faith, her steadiness at moments of crisis, and her devotion to her relatives—all indicate a close-knit, loving family that looked forward to the next generation even while retaining the best of the past. </p><p>Joachim and Anne—whether these are their real names or not—represent that entire quiet series of generations who faithfully perform their duties, practice their faith and establish an atmosphere for the coming of the Messiah, but remain obscure.</p> American Catholic Blog My hope is that my children reach beyond me in character. I don’t want to be their moral ceiling. That makes me responsible to guide and discipline them in directions I don’t always follow. And above all, to show them mercy for their human frailty, as I ask them to show me that same mercy for mine.

Men, Women, and the Mystery of Love

 
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