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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Guilt Trip

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Seth Rogen and Barbra Streisand star in a scene from the movie "The Guilt Trip."
The inevitable tensions of family life have served as the basis for many a screen comedy. In the current holiday season alone, they provide grist for two very different cinematic mills: the crude misfire "This Is 40" and the warmhearted mother-and-son road movie "The Guilt Trip" (Paramount).

Though the latter includes material for mature eyes only, it offers a view of clan interaction that calls to mind St. Paul's inspired insight that the first—and perhaps primary—attribute of real love is patience (1 Cor. 13:4).

Learning that lesson as the film unspools is buttoned-up Los Angeles chemist Andy Brewster (Seth Rogen). Visiting his New York-based mom Joyce (Barbra Streisand) before setting off on a cross-country business trip—during which he'll be pitching a cleaning product he invented to various store chains—Andy discovers a secret about her past: Before she married long-deceased dad, Joyce had a boyfriend for whom she still carries a nostalgic torch these many years later.

This being the age of Google, a moment's research on Andy's part, once he's alone in his room—together with a follow-up phone call—reveals that Joyce's former beau is alive and well, single, and living in San Francisco. Andy decides he'll secretly engineer a reunion by inviting Joyce along on his journey, and pretending that his last appointment is in the City by the Bay. Needless to say, doting Mom is thrilled by the idea.

Not all the adventures that ensue make for family viewing, notably an unintended stop-off at a roadside strip club. But the vibrant mutual affection between the two main characters shines through as they try to reconcile their ill-matched temperaments.

Extrovert Joyce repeatedly runs afoul of Andy's love of the laid-back, and frequently elicits wry observations from him on the eccentricity of her outlook. A creative researcher, but no salesman, Andy could benefit from Joyce's common touch, but bearishly refuses to listen to her advice.

As a dedication included in the end titles hints, and publicity materials for the film explain more fully, screenwriter Dan Fogelman found inspiration for his script in a real-life excursion he and his mother— also named Joyce—undertook together.

By turns amusing and touching, director Anne Fletcher's picture, which sees both Streisand and Rogen in top form, registers as enjoyable fare for grownups.

The film contains brief partial nudity, numerous adult references, a couple of uses of profanity as well as at least one rough and about a dozen crude terms. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



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Peter of Alcantara: Peter was a contemporary of well-known 16th-century Spanish saints, including Ignatius of Loyola and John of the Cross. He served as confessor to St. Teresa of Avila. Church reform was a major issue in Peter’s day, and he directed most of his energies toward that end. His death came one year before the Council of Trent ended. 
<p>Born into a noble family (his father was the governor of Alcantara in Spain), Peter studied law at Salamanca University and, at 16, joined the so-called Observant Franciscans (also known as the discalced, or barefoot, friars). While he practiced many penances, he also demonstrated abilities which were soon recognized. He was named the superior of a new house even before his ordination as a priest; at the age of 39, he was elected provincial; he was a very successful preacher. Still, he was not above washing dishes and cutting wood for the friars. He did not seek attention; indeed, he preferred solitude.</p><p>Peter’s penitential side was evident when it came to food and clothing. It is said that he slept only 90 minutes each night. While others talked about Church reform, Peter’s reform began with himself. His patience was so great that a proverb arose: "To bear such an insult one must have the patience of Peter of Alcantara."</p><p>In 1554, Peter, having received permission, formed a group of Franciscans who followed the Rule of St. Francis with even greater rigor. These friars were known as Alcantarines. Some of the Spanish friars who came to North and South America in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries were members of this group. At the end of the 19th century, the Alcantarines were joined with other Observant friars to form the Order of Friars Minor.</p><p>As spiritual director to St. Teresa, Peter encouraged her in promoting the Carmelite reform. His preaching brought many people to religious life, especially to the Secular Franciscan Order, the friars and the Poor Clares.</p><p>He was canonized in 1669.</p> American Catholic Blog Remember the widow’s mite. She threw into the treasury of the temple only two small coins, but with them, all her great love…. It is, above all, the interior value of the gift that counts: the readiness to share everything, the readiness to give oneself. —Pope John Paul II

 
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