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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Taken 2

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service


Liam Neeson and Maggie Grace star in "Taken 2."
Liam Neeson scowls his way through the sour sequel "Taken 2" (Fox). Moviegoers may find themselves displaying a similar expression should they choose to spend a long 90 minutes watching Neeson tangle with—and inevitably best—one anonymous heavy after another.

This time out, Neeson's Bryan Mills—a retired CIA agent short of fuse but long on mad fighting skills —is up against the machinations of a grudge-bearing Albanian by the name of Murad (Rade Sherbedgia). Murad is out for revenge because Bryan killed his son, the principal baddie of the first installment of the franchise.

Never having been exposed to the civilizing influences of Walmart and the Olive Garden, poor benighted Murad, who's not only Eastern European but a Muslim to boot, fails to understand that junior had his torturous death at Bryan's hands coming. So he hatches a plot to kidnap Bryan, Bryan's ex-wife, Lenore (Famke Janssen), and their teen daughter Kim (Maggie Grace).

Since Kim's previous abduction by Murad's pride and joy—a serial human trafficker—provided the premise of the earlier go-round, perhaps she should contact Lloyd's of London at this point and see if they don't offer an insurance policy for this sort of thing.

The perfunctory setup we witness before Murad springs his trap includes a nod or two in the direction of family togetherness and hints at a possible reconciliation for Bryan and Lenore. But, given that Bryan's methods of paternal protectiveness resemble those of a Mafia don, the emotions expressed on the way to his killing spree ring hollow.

In reality, mayhem for its own sake seems to be the driving principle behind director Olivier Megaton's otherwise largely pointless shoot-em-up.

The film contains frequent, sometimes gory violence, including beatings and torture, brief premarital sensuality, at least one use of profanity and occasional crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13—parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.



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All Saints: The earliest certain observance of a feast in honor of all the saints is an early fourth-century commemoration of "all the martyrs." In the early seventh century, after successive waves of invaders plundered the catacombs, Pope Boniface IV gathered up some 28 wagonloads of bones and reinterred them beneath the Pantheon, a Roman temple dedicated to all the gods. The pope rededicated the shrine as a Christian church. According to Venerable Bede, the pope intended "that the memory of all the saints might in the future be honored in the place which had formerly been dedicated to the worship not of gods but of demons" (<i>On the Calculation of Time</i>). 
<p>But the rededication of the Pantheon, like the earlier commemoration of all the martyrs, occurred in May. Many Eastern Churches still honor all the saints in the spring, either during the Easter season or immediately after Pentecost. </p><p>How the Western Church came to celebrate this feast, now recognized as a solemnity, in November is a puzzle to historians. The Anglo-Saxon theologian Alcuin observed the feast on November 1 in 800, as did his friend Arno, Bishop of Salzburg. Rome finally adopted that date in the ninth century.</p> American Catholic Blog Touch can be an act of kindness when someone is dying. If you visit a sick person and find that you are at a loss for words, reach out and touch her hand.

 
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