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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

A Separation

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

“A Separation” won an Oscar for Best Picture in a Foreign Language in February. Director Asghar Farhadi has the district honor of being the first Iranian filmmaker to ever receive an Oscar.
 
In modern day Tehran, the capitol if Iran, Nadir and Simin are in court to make Simin’s request for a separation and divorce final (for a complete listing of the cast please see the Internet Movie Database http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1832382).  The judge is patient and asks easy questions but it is obvious that the couple loves each other and is reluctant to move forward.
 
Simin explains that they filed for  an exit visa years before and when it finally came they had more than 100 days to act on it; but time is running out. Simin says there is no future for them in Iran and the judge becomes a little hostile. Nadir explains that he cannot leave because his father has Alzhiemer’s and needs his son to care for him. Simin and Nadir have an eleven year-old daughter as well. So either Simin will have to leave the country on her own, hopefully with her daughter, Termeh, or the whole family stays.
 
The judge decides there is not enough cause for a divorce. When they arrive home Simin packs her bag and leaves. While it seems like she is leaving for good, she moves back into her parents’ home. Termeh stays with her father and grandfather.
 
Simin, however, through a friend, finds a woman, Raziah, to care for the elderly man. Raziah is very observant but she has not told her husband she is working for one man and caring for another all day. She vacillates between coming to work and letting her husband have the job. When the old man soils himself she calls a religious information line  to ask is she is permitted by law to change him; she is given the go-ahead.
 
Nadir meets Raziah’s husband and he seems nice enough and eager. But things get complicated when he does not show up for work. Raziah comes again with her little daughter. When she is not looking the old man slips out to buy a paper. Raziah is terrified and runs to find him.
 
Nadir comes home early one day to find his father tied to the bed but unconscious on the floor. Raziah is nowhere to be found. When she appears Nadir’s anger overcomes him; he accuses her of stealing cash that he has on hand and then he pushes her out of the apartment and closes the door.
 
The situation becomes very complicated by this, relationships and friendships broken forever by lies. When the characters start to parcel out blame, beginning with Termeh, it is laid at Simin’s feet because none of this would have happened if she did not want to leave Iran.
 
The is a movie about not only a separation between man and wife, but between parent and child, between a family and their country, middle class and poor, and a separation blocking communication and understanding on many levels. Raziah’s extreme fear of making a religious mistake is palpable thus there exists a profound separation, a lack of integration, between a faith lived for love and being observant out of fear. The visuals, doors, windows, partitions are seamlessly included to reinforce the real partitions and to symbolize ones we cannot see.
 
The obvious conclusion that the theocratic government of Iran is ultimately to blame for the chaos that develops in this finely crafted and deeply felt film. The film is an analogy for Iran and other totalitarian governments and the story highlights the cracks that such a government creates in a society and culture.
 
How does it end? Do take the time to see it if it is playing in your area or rent it on DVD when it becomes available. This is a movie with a lot of dialogue but not a word is superfluous.

What would you have done if you were Namir and Simin?


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Cornelius: 
		<p>There was no pope for 14 months after the martyrdom of St. Fabian because of the intensity of the persecution of the Church. During the interval, the Church was governed by a college of priests. St. Cyprian, a friend of Cornelius, writes that Cornelius was elected pope "by the judgment of God and of Christ, by the testimony of most of the clergy, by the vote of the people, with the consent of aged priests and of good men." </p>
		<p>The greatest problem of Cornelius's two-year term as pope had to do with the Sacrament of Penance and centered on the readmission of Christians who had denied their faith during the time of persecution. Two extremes were finally both condemned. Cyprian, primate of North Africa, appealed to the pope to confirm his stand that the relapsed could be reconciled only by the decision of the bishop. </p>
		<p>In Rome, however, Cornelius met with the opposite view. After his election, a priest named Novatian (one of those who had governed the Church) had himself consecrated a rival bishop of Rome—one of the first antipopes. He denied that the Church had any power to reconcile not only the apostates, but also those guilty of murder, adultery, fornication or second marriage! Cornelius had the support of most of the Church (especially of Cyprian of Africa) in condemning Novatianism, though the sect persisted for several centuries. Cornelius held a synod at Rome in 251 and ordered the "relapsed" to be restored to the Church with the usual "medicines of repentance." </p>
		<p>The friendship of Cornelius and Cyprian was strained for a time when one of Cyprian's rivals made accusations about him. But the problem was cleared up. </p>
		<p>A document from Cornelius shows the extent of organization in the Church of Rome in the mid-third century: 46 priests, seven deacons, seven subdeacons. It is estimated that the number of Christians totaled about 50,000. </p>
		<p>Cornelius died as a result of the hardships of his exile in what is now Civitavecchia (near Rome). <br /> </p>
American Catholic Blog For God judged it better to bring good out of evil than not to permit any evil to exist. —St. Augustine

 
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