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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Lucky One

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

U.S. Marine Sergeant Logan Thibault (Zac Ephron) survives several bombings and ambushes while deployed in Iraq.  This is his third tour. In some rubble along the road he sees a photograph of a beautiful young woman with a message written on the back: “Stay safe” and is signed “Beth”. While holding the photo another bomb goes off where Logan was standing. He starts to think the photo is like a guardian angel or good luck charm for him. Then it happens again; he survives when his buddy is killed.
 
When Logan returns home he goes to stay with his sister and her family in Colorado. It soon becomes evident he is suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).  But he is still haunted by the photo and instead of going to the VA to get help he decides to walk across the county with his beloved German shepherd Zeus to find her. And he does - at a kennel in Louisiana.
 
Beth (Taylor Schilling) thinks Logan is there for a job but when he says he is a former marine she turns him away. But her grandmother (Blythe Danner), with whom Beth and her seven year-old son Ben (Riley Thomas Stewart) live, hires him anyway. We soon learn that Beth’s beloved older brother was a marine killed in combat but so far the military has not told them how he died but they suggested that friendly fire may have had a role in his death. On no evidence Beth suspects that Logan might have been involved. Beth has survived much loss: their parents were killed in an accident when she and her brother were young. She became pregnant as a senior in high school, married the father, Keith (Jay R. Ferguson) who is a bully dressed in a deputy sheriff’s uniform.  They are now divorced.
 
“The Lucky One” is based on the best-selling novel by Nicholas Sparks and I was privileged to meet him last Saturday during the press day for the film. When asked about the predictability of his stories he described the formula that resonates with readers: a plot that moves through all life’s emotions from loss, sorrow, jealousy, betrayal, sadness, tragedy, reconciliation, love to joy.  He also said that there are three things that he insists on when his books are turned into movies: 1) That the spirit and intent of the story are maintained 2) that the spirit and intent of the characters are maintained and 3) that the filmmakers make the best movie possible. In other words Sparks does not mind artistic license if it serves the story.

“The Lucky One” is the fourth collaboration between Nicholas Sparks and producer Denise Di Novi and a fifth is in the works.


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John Vianney: A man with vision overcomes obstacles and performs deeds that seem impossible. John Vianney was a man with vision: He wanted to become a priest. But he had to overcome his meager formal schooling, which inadequately prepared him for seminary studies. 
<p>His failure to comprehend Latin lectures forced him to discontinue. But his vision of being a priest urged him to seek private tutoring. After a lengthy battle with the books, John was ordained. </p><p>Situations calling for “impossible” deeds followed him everywhere. As pastor of the parish at Ars, John encountered people who were indifferent and quite comfortable with their style of living. His vision led him through severe fasts and short nights of sleep. (Some devils can only be cast out by prayer and fasting.) </p><p>With Catherine Lassagne and Benedicta Lardet, he established La Providence, a home for girls. Only a man of vision could have such trust that God would provide for the spiritual and material needs of all those who came to make La Providence their home. </p><p>His work as a confessor is John Vianney’s most remarkable accomplishment. In the winter months he was to spend 11 to 12 hours daily reconciling people with God. In the summer months this time was increased to 16 hours. Unless a man was dedicated to his vision of a priestly vocation, he could not have endured this giving of self day after day. </p><p>Many people look forward to retirement and taking it easy, doing the things they always wanted to do but never had the time. But John Vianney had no thoughts of retirement. As his fame spread, more hours were consumed in serving God’s people. Even the few hours he would allow himself for sleep were disturbed frequently by the devil. </p><p>Who, but a man with vision, could keep going with ever-increasing strength? In 1929, Pope Pius XI named him the patron of parish priests worldwide.</p> American Catholic Blog The most beautiful and spontaneous expressions of joy which I have seen during my life were by poor people who had little to hold on to. –Pope Francis

The Blessing of Family

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
St. John Vianney
Do you know a priest who reminds you of St. John Vianney? Send him an e-card to thank him for his ministry.

Birthday
May God bless you today with gentle surprises.

Mary's Flower - Fleur-de-lis
More countless than the drops in an ocean are the repetitions down the ages of those gracious words: “Hail, Full of Grace, the Lord is with thee.”

St. Ignatius Loyola
The founder of the Society of Jesus is also a patron of all who were educated by the Jesuits.

Anniversary
We continue to fall in love again and again throughout our years together.




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