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October Baby

Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.

“October Baby” tells the fictional story of Hannah  (newcomer Rachel Hendrix), a 19-year old college student who collapses during the performance of a play. In an effort to find out why she is having medical issues and nightmares her parents tell her she is adopted. This overwhelming news sends her and her best friend, Jason, on a road trip to find her real mother.

Along the way Rachel must sort through all kinds of emotional issue especially anger and abandonment.
She tracks down a nurse (Jasmine Guy) who tells her the story of the botched abortion that took her twin brother’s life and how Rachel survived.
Rachel finally meets her birth mother and the last few minutes of the film conclude in a way that will make most viewers shed a tear.
“October Baby” is a film with a good heart but it is preachy and heavy on messages. Personally I do not think our young people will sit through such a drudgery to get to the final scenes. Christian filmmakers such as Andrew and Jon Erwin who directed, co-produced and co-wrote the film, need to understand story-telling better and trust the audience to “get it.” If it is a good story it will evoke a positive response.
  The actors are in dire need of acting school except for veterans Jasmine Gray and John Schneider. The cinematography is good but it cannot make up for a leaden script and delivery.

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John of Monte Corvino: At a time when the Church was heavily embroiled in nationalistic rivalries within Europe, it was also reaching across Asia to spread the gospel of Jesus Christ to the Mongols. John of Monte Corvino went to China about the same time Marco Polo was returning. 
<p>John was a soldier, judge and doctor before he became a friar. Prior to going to Tabriz, Persia (present-day Iran), in 1278, he was well known for his preaching and teaching. In 1291 he left Tabriz as a legate of Pope Nicholas IV to the court of Kublai Khan. An Italian merchant, a Dominican friar and John traveled to western India where the Dominican died. When John and the Italian merchant arrived in China in 1294, Kublai Khan had recently died. </p><p>Nestorian Christians, successors to the dissidents of the fifth-century Council of Ephesus’ teaching on Jesus Christ, had been in China since the seventh century. John converted some of them and also some of the Chinese, including Prince George from Tenduk, northwest of Beijing. Prince George named his son after this holy friar. </p><p>John established his headquarters in Khanbalik (now Beijing), where he built two churches; his was the first resident Catholic mission in the country. By 1304 he had translated the Psalms and the New Testament into the Tatar language. </p><p>Responding to two letters from John, Pope Clement V named John Archbishop of Khanbalik in 1307 and consecrated seven friars as bishops of neighboring dioceses. One of the seven never left Europe. Three others died along the way to China; the remaining three bishops and the friars who accompanied them arrived there in 1308. </p><p>When John died in 1328, he was mourned by Christians and non-Christians. His tomb quickly became a place of pilgrimage. In 1368, Christianity was banished from China when the Mongols were expelled and the Ming dynasty began. John’s cause has been introduced in Rome.</p> American Catholic Blog We look ahead to the coming of the Son of Man, standing erect and with heads held high. We live in hope, not in fear. Our experience of God is no longer limited by human weakness or even human sinfulness. God has always been one step ahead of us, with a plan that exceeds our greatest desires.

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