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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

John Carter

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

This epically expensive film cost Disney $200 million dollars to produce. It’s both a throwback to American history and futuristic sci-fi story based on a character and series of novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs of “Tarzan” fame.
 
John Carter is a former Confederate soldier who heads west to Arizona Territory only for men to try to force him to fight their frontier battles. But John does not believe in war or violence and he resists. Then he is mysteriously transported to Mars where strange beings capture him. Some are kindly; they only want to communicate because they wonder about his amazing ability to jump huge distances and heights. He wonders about this himself and this gift comes in very handy as his adventures increase. Others do not like him. Humans are there, too, with one group is fighting to take over the other. He is attracted to the Princess of Helium who does not want to marry the head of the other city that her father thinks will ensure peace.
 
And on and on.
 
“John Carter” initials are “J.C.”, in other words, he could be considered a kind of savior figure to the people of Helium and other creatures of Mars or Barsoom as they call the planet. The only point I got out of this long and rambling movie – that is strangely watchable – is that Carter stands for peace and non-violence.
 
Otherwise much of the film, including the melodramatic music in the first part, is like a 1950s “B” movie. In other words, it’s corny and campy.
  If you know the Tarzan stories you will notice much similarity: men among aliens, in alien environments, one swings from trees in the jungle and the other jumps canyons and cliffs to escape danger, save the princess, and avoid conflict.


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Anthony Zaccaria: At the same time that Martin Luther was attacking abuses in the Church, a reformation within the Church was already being attempted. Among the early movers of the Counter-Reformation was Anthony Zaccaria. His mother became a widow at 18 and devoted herself to the spiritual education of her son. He received a medical doctorate at 22 and, while working among the poor of his native Cremona in Italy, was attracted to the religious apostolate. He renounced his rights to any future inheritance, worked as a catechist and was ordained a priest at the age of 26. Called to Milan in a few years, he laid the foundations of three religious congregations, one for men and one for women, plus an association of married couples. Their aim was the reform of the decadent society of their day, beginning with the clergy, religious and lay people. 
<p>Greatly inspired by St. Paul (his congregation is named the Barnabites, after the companion of that saint), Anthony preached with great vigor in church and street, conducted popular missions and was not ashamed of doing public penance. </p><p>He encouraged such innovations as the collaboration of the laity in the apostolate, frequent Communion, the Forty Hours devotion and the ringing of church bells at 3:00 p.m. on Fridays. </p><p>His holiness moved many to reform their lives but, as with all saints, it also moved many to oppose him. Twice his community had to undergo official religious investigation, and twice it was exonerated. </p><p>While on a mission of peace, he became seriously ill and was brought home for a visit to his mother. He died at Cremona at the age of 36.</p> American Catholic Blog Lord, help me make my life more about you and less about me. May others see you in me—your image and likeness. Teach me ways to increase my time with you, my service to others, and my love for my family, for strangers, and for the poor. You are the light in the darkness. With each new day, may we be light to one another.

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