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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Salmon Fishing in Yemen

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: Catholic News Service

Dr. Alfred Jones “Fred” (Ewan McGregor) is a staid civil servant in London, an expert in the fisheries division of the government. He leads a quiet life with his mostly absent professional wife Mary (Rachael Sterling).  One day the department receives a letter from Harriet (Emily Blunt) inviting them to allow Fred to consult on a fishing project for Sheik Mohammad (Amr Waked).
 
The wealthy sheik has learned to love salmon fishing in Scotland where he has one of his many estates. He wants to create the same peaceful experience for his people in Yemen.
 
Fred scoffs at the idea of importing salmon to the Yemen due to climate and terrain. He resists but Patricia (Kristen Scott Thomas), the prime minister’s PR person, thinks it is a brilliant idea to demonstrate the government’s efforts to partner with a Middle Eastern country for a peace effort. Fred is basically forced to take on the task when his boss hints that his job may be terminated.
 
Harriett is very professional; she works for the firm that manages the sheik’s property and affairs. She and Fred go to Scotland to visit the sheik. Although Fred is still incredulous about the idea of salmon fishing in Yemen, a country without a single permanent river, he is drawn to the sheik’s vision of faith and possibility.
 
When Fred discovers that the sheik has already created a dam that would release enough water to create a river for the salmon, he is intrigued and agrees to consult on the project.
 
“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” is a beautiful, gentle story of possibility and faith based on the 2006 award-winning comic novel of the same title by Paul Torday.  Director Lasse Hallstrom has created a beautiful film with nuanced performances by Ewan McGregor and Emily Blunt. Kristen Scott Thomas’ Patricia is crafty and annoying but her character works.
 
“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” is also a romantic comedy with surprising depth and spirituality and it avoids all the clichés that characterize over-the-top comedies of recent years. While there are several differences between the book and the novel I liked both, especially the way the film ends as contrasted with the book’s ending. 
 
I had the opportunity to interview Ewan McGregor by phone a few weeks ago and he said that Fred was English in the book but he made the character “Scottish because I recognized the character from people I knew growing up in Scotland – an emotional and sexually awkward man.” He also said that he had to learn fly-fishing and had to practice and practice. He admitted that he “has no desire to catch a fish” but likes the “meditative aspect and the way focusing helps you clear your mind.”
 
McGregor described Sheik Mohammad’s spirituality as “running off him”. “He makes you think that salmon fishing in Yemen just might work.” He also described actor Amr Waked as “a beautiful man to look at with a beautiful soul” who works for change and peace in his home country of Egypt.
 
I asked McGregor if he would like to comment on the film for the faith community. That idea stumped him and then he said something that is really good to think about when looking at films. He said that ”if a film is good the director will leave space for the audience to make its own meaning and not impose his or her own point of view.”

The film offers a lot to consider and contemplate about faith and life. At one point in the film Fred and Harriett pass by several of the Sheik’s servants and staff in prayer and I think it is Fred who remarks, “When was the last time you saw so many people pray?” The Sheik is a kind of mystical character and the story has a fairy tale quality about it that made it one of the gentlest films about faith and transformation I have seen in a long time.


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Hugh of Grenoble: Today’s saint could be a patron for those of us who feel so overwhelmed by all the problems in the world that we don’t know where to begin. 
<p>Hugh, who served as a bishop in France for 52 years, had his work cut out for him from the start. Corruption seemed to loom in every direction: the buying and selling of Church offices, violations of clerical celibacy, lay control of Church property, religious indifference and/or ignorance. After serving as bishop for two years, he’d had his fill. He tried disappearing to a monastery, but the pope called him back to continue the work of reform. </p><p>Ironically, Hugh was reasonably effective in the role of reformer—surely because of his devotion to the Church but also because of his strong character. In conflicts between Church and state he was an unflinching defender of the Church. He fearlessly supported the papacy. He was eloquent as a preacher. He restored his own cathedral, made civic improvements in the town and weathered a brief exile. </p><p>Hugh may be best known as patron and benefactor of St. Bruno, founder of the Carthusian Order. </p><p>Hugh died in 1132. He was canonized only two years later.</p> American Catholic Blog In our lives, Lord, you make wondrous things happen that deeply impress us; then as time passes, we forget. Father, deepen my faith in you and my trust in your love and care for me, so I may be strong when difficult times occur that will test my love and loyalty to you. I ask for this grace in Jesus's name, Amen.


 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Wednesday of Holy Week
Today keep in prayer all the priests and ministers throughout the world who will preside at Holy Week services.

Tuesday of Holy Week
While Lent has a penitential character, it is also a time for reflecting on the baptismal commitment we make as Christians.

Monday of Holy Week
Holy Week reminds us of the price Jesus paid for our salvation. Take time for prayer at home and at church.

Palm Sunday
Holy Week services and prayers invite us to follow Jesus into Jerusalem, experiencing the events of his passion and death.

Praying for You
As they grow closer to the Easter sacraments, your parish’s RCIA candidates count on your prayers.




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