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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Salmon Fishing in Yemen

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: Catholic News Service

Dr. Alfred Jones “Fred” (Ewan McGregor) is a staid civil servant in London, an expert in the fisheries division of the government. He leads a quiet life with his mostly absent professional wife Mary (Rachael Sterling).  One day the department receives a letter from Harriet (Emily Blunt) inviting them to allow Fred to consult on a fishing project for Sheik Mohammad (Amr Waked).
 
The wealthy sheik has learned to love salmon fishing in Scotland where he has one of his many estates. He wants to create the same peaceful experience for his people in Yemen.
 
Fred scoffs at the idea of importing salmon to the Yemen due to climate and terrain. He resists but Patricia (Kristen Scott Thomas), the prime minister’s PR person, thinks it is a brilliant idea to demonstrate the government’s efforts to partner with a Middle Eastern country for a peace effort. Fred is basically forced to take on the task when his boss hints that his job may be terminated.
 
Harriett is very professional; she works for the firm that manages the sheik’s property and affairs. She and Fred go to Scotland to visit the sheik. Although Fred is still incredulous about the idea of salmon fishing in Yemen, a country without a single permanent river, he is drawn to the sheik’s vision of faith and possibility.
 
When Fred discovers that the sheik has already created a dam that would release enough water to create a river for the salmon, he is intrigued and agrees to consult on the project.
 
“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” is a beautiful, gentle story of possibility and faith based on the 2006 award-winning comic novel of the same title by Paul Torday.  Director Lasse Hallstrom has created a beautiful film with nuanced performances by Ewan McGregor and Emily Blunt. Kristen Scott Thomas’ Patricia is crafty and annoying but her character works.
 
“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” is also a romantic comedy with surprising depth and spirituality and it avoids all the clichés that characterize over-the-top comedies of recent years. While there are several differences between the book and the novel I liked both, especially the way the film ends as contrasted with the book’s ending. 
 
I had the opportunity to interview Ewan McGregor by phone a few weeks ago and he said that Fred was English in the book but he made the character “Scottish because I recognized the character from people I knew growing up in Scotland – an emotional and sexually awkward man.” He also said that he had to learn fly-fishing and had to practice and practice. He admitted that he “has no desire to catch a fish” but likes the “meditative aspect and the way focusing helps you clear your mind.”
 
McGregor described Sheik Mohammad’s spirituality as “running off him”. “He makes you think that salmon fishing in Yemen just might work.” He also described actor Amr Waked as “a beautiful man to look at with a beautiful soul” who works for change and peace in his home country of Egypt.
 
I asked McGregor if he would like to comment on the film for the faith community. That idea stumped him and then he said something that is really good to think about when looking at films. He said that ”if a film is good the director will leave space for the audience to make its own meaning and not impose his or her own point of view.”

The film offers a lot to consider and contemplate about faith and life. At one point in the film Fred and Harriett pass by several of the Sheik’s servants and staff in prayer and I think it is Fred who remarks, “When was the last time you saw so many people pray?” The Sheik is a kind of mystical character and the story has a fairy tale quality about it that made it one of the gentlest films about faith and transformation I have seen in a long time.


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Rose of Lima: The first canonized saint of the New World has one characteristic of all saints—the suffering of opposition—and another characteristic which is more for admiration than for imitation—excessive practice of mortification. 
<p>She was born to parents of Spanish descent in Lima, Peru, at a time when South America was in its first century of evangelization. She seems to have taken Catherine of Siena (April 29) as a model, in spite of the objections and ridicule of parents and friends. </p><p>The saints have so great a love of God that what seems bizarre to us, and is indeed sometimes imprudent, is simply a logical carrying out of a conviction that anything that might endanger a loving relationship with God must be rooted out. So, because her beauty was so often admired, Rose used to rub her face with pepper to produce disfiguring blotches. Later, she wore a thick circlet of silver on her head, studded on the inside, like a crown of thorns. </p><p>When her parents fell into financial trouble, she worked in the garden all day and sewed at night. Ten years of struggle against her parents began when they tried to make Rose marry. They refused to let her enter a convent, and out of obedience she continued her life of penance and solitude at home as a member of the Third Order of St. Dominic. So deep was her desire to live the life of Christ that she spent most of her time at home in solitude. </p><p>During the last few years of her life, Rose set up a room in the house where she cared for homeless children, the elderly and the sick. This was a beginning of social services in Peru. Though secluded in life and activity, she was brought to the attention of Inquisition interrogators, who could only say that she was influenced by grace. </p><p>What might have been a merely eccentric life was transfigured from the inside. If we remember some unusual penances, we should also remember the greatest thing about Rose: a love of God so ardent that it withstood ridicule from without, violent temptation and lengthy periods of sickness. When she died at 31, the city turned out for her funeral. Prominent men took turns carrying her coffin.</p> American Catholic Blog Father, open our minds and our hearts so we can be more understanding of the obstacles faced by so many hurting people. Help us to be more like Jesus in accepting people for who are they are and not for what we think they should be. We ask for this grace through Jesus, your Son and our model. Amen.

 
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