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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Salmon Fishing in Yemen

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: Catholic News Service

Dr. Alfred Jones “Fred” (Ewan McGregor) is a staid civil servant in London, an expert in the fisheries division of the government. He leads a quiet life with his mostly absent professional wife Mary (Rachael Sterling).  One day the department receives a letter from Harriet (Emily Blunt) inviting them to allow Fred to consult on a fishing project for Sheik Mohammad (Amr Waked).
 
The wealthy sheik has learned to love salmon fishing in Scotland where he has one of his many estates. He wants to create the same peaceful experience for his people in Yemen.
 
Fred scoffs at the idea of importing salmon to the Yemen due to climate and terrain. He resists but Patricia (Kristen Scott Thomas), the prime minister’s PR person, thinks it is a brilliant idea to demonstrate the government’s efforts to partner with a Middle Eastern country for a peace effort. Fred is basically forced to take on the task when his boss hints that his job may be terminated.
 
Harriett is very professional; she works for the firm that manages the sheik’s property and affairs. She and Fred go to Scotland to visit the sheik. Although Fred is still incredulous about the idea of salmon fishing in Yemen, a country without a single permanent river, he is drawn to the sheik’s vision of faith and possibility.
 
When Fred discovers that the sheik has already created a dam that would release enough water to create a river for the salmon, he is intrigued and agrees to consult on the project.
 
“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” is a beautiful, gentle story of possibility and faith based on the 2006 award-winning comic novel of the same title by Paul Torday.  Director Lasse Hallstrom has created a beautiful film with nuanced performances by Ewan McGregor and Emily Blunt. Kristen Scott Thomas’ Patricia is crafty and annoying but her character works.
 
“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” is also a romantic comedy with surprising depth and spirituality and it avoids all the clichés that characterize over-the-top comedies of recent years. While there are several differences between the book and the novel I liked both, especially the way the film ends as contrasted with the book’s ending. 
 
I had the opportunity to interview Ewan McGregor by phone a few weeks ago and he said that Fred was English in the book but he made the character “Scottish because I recognized the character from people I knew growing up in Scotland – an emotional and sexually awkward man.” He also said that he had to learn fly-fishing and had to practice and practice. He admitted that he “has no desire to catch a fish” but likes the “meditative aspect and the way focusing helps you clear your mind.”
 
McGregor described Sheik Mohammad’s spirituality as “running off him”. “He makes you think that salmon fishing in Yemen just might work.” He also described actor Amr Waked as “a beautiful man to look at with a beautiful soul” who works for change and peace in his home country of Egypt.
 
I asked McGregor if he would like to comment on the film for the faith community. That idea stumped him and then he said something that is really good to think about when looking at films. He said that ”if a film is good the director will leave space for the audience to make its own meaning and not impose his or her own point of view.”

The film offers a lot to consider and contemplate about faith and life. At one point in the film Fred and Harriett pass by several of the Sheik’s servants and staff in prayer and I think it is Fred who remarks, “When was the last time you saw so many people pray?” The Sheik is a kind of mystical character and the story has a fairy tale quality about it that made it one of the gentlest films about faith and transformation I have seen in a long time.




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Catherine of Siena: The value Catherine makes central in her short life and which sounds clearly and consistently through her experience is complete surrender to Christ. What is most impressive about her is that she learns to view her surrender to her Lord as a goal to be reached through time. 
<p>She was the 23rd child of Jacopo and Lapa Benincasa and grew up as an intelligent, cheerful and intensely religious person. Catherine disappointed her mother by cutting off her hair as a protest against being overly encouraged to improve her appearance in order to attract a husband. Her father ordered her to be left in peace, and she was given a room of her own for prayer and meditation. </p><p>She entered the Dominican Third Order at 18 and spent the next three years in seclusion, prayer and austerity. Gradually a group of followers gathered around her—men and women, priests and religious. An active public apostolate grew out of her contemplative life. Her letters, mostly for spiritual instruction and encouragement of her followers, began to take more and more note of public affairs. Opposition and slander resulted from her mixing fearlessly with the world and speaking with the candor and authority of one completely committed to Christ. She was cleared of all charges at the Dominican General Chapter of 1374. </p><p>Her public influence reached great heights because of her evident holiness, her membership in the Dominican Third Order, and the deep impression she made on the pope. She worked tirelessly for the crusade against the Turks and for peace between Florence and the pope </p><p>In 1378, the Great Schism began, splitting the allegiance of Christendom between two, then three, popes and putting even saints on opposing sides. Catherine spent the last two years of her life in Rome, in prayer and pleading on behalf of the cause of Urban VI and the unity of the Church. She offered herself as a victim for the Church in its agony. She died surrounded by her "children" and was canonized in 1461. </p><p>Catherine ranks high among the mystics and spiritual writers of the Church. In 1939, she and Francis of Assisi were declared co-patrons of Italy. Paul VI named her and Teresa of Avila doctors of the Church in 1970. Her spiritual testament is found in <i>The Dialogue</i>.</p> American Catholic Blog The gates of hell cannot withstand the power of heaven. Gates of sin melt in the presence of saving grace; gates of death fall in the presence of eternal life; gates of falsehood collapse in the presence of living truth; gates of violence are flattened in the presence of divine love. These are the tools with which Christ has equipped his Church.

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