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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Salmon Fishing in Yemen

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: Catholic News Service

Dr. Alfred Jones “Fred” (Ewan McGregor) is a staid civil servant in London, an expert in the fisheries division of the government. He leads a quiet life with his mostly absent professional wife Mary (Rachael Sterling).  One day the department receives a letter from Harriet (Emily Blunt) inviting them to allow Fred to consult on a fishing project for Sheik Mohammad (Amr Waked).
 
The wealthy sheik has learned to love salmon fishing in Scotland where he has one of his many estates. He wants to create the same peaceful experience for his people in Yemen.
 
Fred scoffs at the idea of importing salmon to the Yemen due to climate and terrain. He resists but Patricia (Kristen Scott Thomas), the prime minister’s PR person, thinks it is a brilliant idea to demonstrate the government’s efforts to partner with a Middle Eastern country for a peace effort. Fred is basically forced to take on the task when his boss hints that his job may be terminated.
 
Harriett is very professional; she works for the firm that manages the sheik’s property and affairs. She and Fred go to Scotland to visit the sheik. Although Fred is still incredulous about the idea of salmon fishing in Yemen, a country without a single permanent river, he is drawn to the sheik’s vision of faith and possibility.
 
When Fred discovers that the sheik has already created a dam that would release enough water to create a river for the salmon, he is intrigued and agrees to consult on the project.
 
“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” is a beautiful, gentle story of possibility and faith based on the 2006 award-winning comic novel of the same title by Paul Torday.  Director Lasse Hallstrom has created a beautiful film with nuanced performances by Ewan McGregor and Emily Blunt. Kristen Scott Thomas’ Patricia is crafty and annoying but her character works.
 
“Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” is also a romantic comedy with surprising depth and spirituality and it avoids all the clichés that characterize over-the-top comedies of recent years. While there are several differences between the book and the novel I liked both, especially the way the film ends as contrasted with the book’s ending. 
 
I had the opportunity to interview Ewan McGregor by phone a few weeks ago and he said that Fred was English in the book but he made the character “Scottish because I recognized the character from people I knew growing up in Scotland – an emotional and sexually awkward man.” He also said that he had to learn fly-fishing and had to practice and practice. He admitted that he “has no desire to catch a fish” but likes the “meditative aspect and the way focusing helps you clear your mind.”
 
McGregor described Sheik Mohammad’s spirituality as “running off him”. “He makes you think that salmon fishing in Yemen just might work.” He also described actor Amr Waked as “a beautiful man to look at with a beautiful soul” who works for change and peace in his home country of Egypt.
 
I asked McGregor if he would like to comment on the film for the faith community. That idea stumped him and then he said something that is really good to think about when looking at films. He said that ”if a film is good the director will leave space for the audience to make its own meaning and not impose his or her own point of view.”

The film offers a lot to consider and contemplate about faith and life. At one point in the film Fred and Harriett pass by several of the Sheik’s servants and staff in prayer and I think it is Fred who remarks, “When was the last time you saw so many people pray?” The Sheik is a kind of mystical character and the story has a fairy tale quality about it that made it one of the gentlest films about faith and transformation I have seen in a long time.


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Bede the Venerable: Bede is one of the few saints honored as such even during his lifetime. His writings were filled with such faith and learning that even while he was still alive, a Church council ordered them to be read publicly in the churches. 
<p>At an early age Bede was entrusted to the care of the abbot of the Monastery of St. Paul, Jarrow. The happy combination of genius and the instruction of scholarly, saintly monks produced a saint and an extraordinary scholar, perhaps the most outstanding one of his day. He was deeply versed in all the sciences of his times: natural philosophy, the philosophical principles of Aristotle, astronomy, arithmetic, grammar, ecclesiastical history, the lives of the saints and, especially, Holy Scripture.</p><p>From the time of his ordination to the priesthood at 30 (he had been ordained deacon at 19) till his death, he was ever occupied with learning, writing and teaching. Besides the many books that he copied, he composed 45 of his own, including 30 commentaries on books of the Bible. </p><p>Although eagerly sought by kings and other notables, even Pope Sergius, Bede managed to remain in his own monastery till his death. Only once did he leave for a few months in order to teach in the school of the archbishop of York. Bede died in 735 praying his favorite prayer: “Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As in the beginning, so now, and forever.” </p><p>His <i>Ecclesiastical History of the English People</i> is commonly regarded as of decisive importance in the art and science of writing history. A unique era was coming to an end at the time of Bede’s death: It had fulfilled its purpose of preparing Western Christianity to assimilate the non-Roman barbarian North. Bede recognized the opening to a new day in the life of the Church even as it was happening.</p> American Catholic Blog The truth is that suffering can be a beautiful thing, if we have the courage to trust God with everything, like Jesus did upon the cross.

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