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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Gone

By
John Mulderig
Source: Catholic News Service

If impersonating a real movie were a crime, the painfully inept thriller "Gone" (Summit) would be facing an open-and-shut case. Although morally acceptable for adult viewers, this tedious outing is cinematically recommendable to none.

Chief among the characters you won't care about, acting on motivations you won't believe to do things no sensible person would, is Portland, Ore., waitress Jill (Amanda Seyfried).

A year ago, it seems, poor Jill was abducted by a Ted Bundy wannabe and kept in a hole in the ground ("It places the lotion in the basket...") out in the woods. Although she escaped, no evidence of the crime could be discovered; so the police down at the local precinct think she's crazy.

That's inconvenient once Jill arrives home from the graveyard shift one morning to discover that her sister Molly (Emily Wickersham), with whom she has been living, has disappeared. Fearing that the killer who once captured her has now returned to kidnap Molly, resolute Jill sets off in search of Sis. And drags us along for the ride.

Those not overcome by ennui will glimpse Jill in outline behind a shower curtain, discover that a minor character has a man in his bed, and hear the kind of words Dad might have given vent to after hitting his thumb with a hammer.

Jill's do-it-yourself pursuit of justice aside, there's nothing really wrong with director Heitor Dhalia's flimsy flick. But there's absolutely nothing right about it either.

The film contains vigilantism, brief, shadowy partial nudity, an incidental gay situation, a few uses of profanity, at least one instance of the F-word and some crude and crass language. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III — adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 — parents strongly cautioned. Some material may be inappropriate for children under 13.

*****
John Mulderig is on the staff of Catholic News Service.





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Joseph Benedict Cottolengo: In some ways Joseph exemplified St. Francis’ advice, "Let us begin to serve the Lord God, for up to now we have made little or no progress" (<i>1 Celano, </i>#103). 
<p>Joseph was the eldest of 12 children. Born in Piedmont, he was ordained for the Diocese of Turin in 1811. Frail health and difficulty in school were obstacles he overcame to reach ordination. </p><p>During Joseph’s lifetime Italy was torn by civil war while the poor and the sick suffered from neglect. Inspired by reading the life of St. Vincent de Paul and moved by the human suffering all around him, Joseph rented some rooms to nurse the sick of his parish and recruited local young women to serve as staff. </p><p>In 1832 at Voldocco, Joseph founded the House of Providence which served many different groups (the sick, the elderly, students, the mentally ill, the blind). All of this was financed by contributions. Popularly called "the University of Charity," this testimonial to God’s goodness was serving 8,000 people by the time of Joseph’s beatification in 1917. </p><p>To carry on his work, Joseph organized two religious communities, the Brothers of St. Vincent de Paul and the Sisters of St. Vincent de Paul. Joseph, who had joined the Secular Franciscans as a young man, was canonized in 1934.</p> American Catholic Blog The image of God! This is what it means to be human! We are not just a bunch of cells randomly thrown together by some impersonal forces. Rather, we reflect an eternal God who knew us from before we were made and purposely called us into being.

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