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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Secret World of Arrietty

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

This beautifully animated adaptation of the multi-award-winning 1952 children’s novel by Mary Norton, “The Borrowers” is one of the gentlest films I have seen in a long time.

Arrrietty and her family are little people. They believe that if human “beans” see them their curiosity will destroy them and therefore they must move every time this happens. Arrietty and her family think they are the only little people left on the earth.
 
Arrietty, her mother Homily, and her father Pod (for all voices please see http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1568921/), live under the floorboards of a country house tended to be Hara (voice of Carol Burnett, US version).  Pod is somber and wise and works to make things for his family. He goes on “borrowing” expeditions at night to obtain provisions from the human “beans” who live in the house above them.
 
When Arrietty is almost 14 her mother permits her to go on her first borrowing adventure. Arrietty and Pod are excellent climbers who trek up and down piles of stuff, fabric, and table legs, to borrow what they need. Pod reminds Arrietty that Borrowers don’t hoard things.
 
One day a regular sized boy named Shawn arrives at the country house. His great aunt has brought him there so he can get regain some strength before he has heart surgery in a few weeks.  His parents are divorced and always working and he seems sad. He sees Arrietty and she sees him. But she is not as frightened as her parents. The two young people begin to communicate.
 
Of course things get complicated because there is a legend about the little people; Shawn’s mother and grandfather believed in them. In fact, they built a dollhouse just for them but it seems the little people never knew about it. When Hara realizes that Shawn has discovered the little people, she sets out to capture one.
 
“The Secret World of Arrietty” comes to us from first-time Japanese director Hiromasa Yonebayashi whose previous animation efforts include “Howl’s Moving Castle” and “Spirited Away.”  Hayao Miyazaki, who is certainly the most prodigious and significant rival to Disney to ever emerge on the scene, wrote “Arrietty”.
 
This is a movie that lets us see the world from a different perspective, that of ‘the other’, the little people who live in hiding and are always on the move in order to survive. Shawn, who himself needs care, is very careful to treat the Borrowers with respect and is always aware of his size in relation to Arrietty who is just big enough to pick up a sugar cube.
 
The theme of the little people “borrowing” only what they need is very important to Pod but Homily seems to be a collector and she is very anxious about their safety. Only living with what we need is a good message for us during Lent. But is there a larger ethical question here: are they stealing? Do they have a right to “borrow” or to steal in a world that is too big for them?
 
Pod also has something wise to say about violence when Arrietty finds a weapon (a straight pin).
 
I don’t know if “The Secret World of Arrietty” is a good adaptation of the book “The Borrowers” (actually there is a series of them) but I loved the beautiful world of the film, the moral imaginary journey of trying to live and be happy by walking in the shoes, or seeing through the eyes, of people different that me. And I appreciated the girl Arrietty’s gumption and the boy Shawn’s quiet strength in adversity. Finally, here is a film with two complementary heroes, each respectful of the other and courageous in their own way.




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Philip Neri: Philip Neri was a sign of contradiction, combining popularity with piety against the background of a corrupt Rome and a disinterested clergy, the whole post-Renaissance malaise. 
<p>At an early age, he abandoned the chance to become a businessman, moved to Rome from Florence and devoted his life and individuality to God. After three years of philosophy and theology studies, he gave up any thought of ordination. The next 13 years were spent in a vocation unusual at the time—that of a layperson actively engaged in prayer and the apostolate. </p><p>As the Council of Trent (1545-63) was reforming the Church on a doctrinal level, Philip’s appealing personality was winning him friends from all levels of society, from beggars to cardinals. He rapidly gathered around himself a group of laypersons won over by his audacious spirituality. Initially they met as an informal prayer and discussion group, and also served poor people in Rome. </p><p>At the urging of his confessor, he was ordained a priest and soon became an outstanding confessor, gifted with the knack of piercing the pretenses and illusions of others, though always in a charitable manner and often with a joke. He arranged talks, discussions and prayers for his penitents in a room above the church. He sometimes led “excursions” to other churches, often with music and a picnic on the way. </p><p>Some of his followers became priests and lived together in community. This was the beginning of the Oratory, the religious institute he founded. A feature of their life was a daily afternoon service of four informal talks, with vernacular hymns and prayers. Giovanni Palestrina was one of Philip’s followers, and composed music for the services. </p><p>The Oratory was finally approved after suffering through a period of accusations of being an assembly of heretics, where laypersons preached and sang vernacular hymns! (Cardinal Newman founded the first English-speaking house of the Oratory three centuries later.) </p><p>Philip’s advice was sought by many of the prominent figures of his day. He is one of the influential figures of the Counter-Reformation, mainly for converting to personal holiness many of the influential people within the Church itself. His characteristic virtues were humility and gaiety.</p> American Catholic Blog We need do no more than we are doing at present; that is, to love divine Providence and abandon ourselves in his arms and heart.<br />—St. Padre Pio

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