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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Woman in Black

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Arthur Kipps (Daniel Radcliff) is a London lawyer around 1910 that is performing poorly since lost his wife four years previously when his son was born.
 
His boss at the law firm gives him one last chance and sends him to a remote town on the northern coast of England to go through the papers of an old woman recently deceased. On Tuesday Arthur promises his son they will soon be together as the nanny is to bring the boy to the town by train on Friday for a little holiday.
 
As soon as he gets off the train people react badly to him and want him gone. He manages to get a room at a pub but it has a terrible story. Three little girls walked out of the window years before and died. She and her husband lost a son when the tide flooded the causeway linking the house to the mainland and his body was never recovered.
 
Arthur meets one man who seems normal, Mr. Daily (Ciaran Hinds). He is the only one in town with a vehicle but he and his wife lost a son as well. But against the advice of everyone, Arthur makes his way across the causeway leading to the old mansion.
 
Arthur misses his wife and reads about séances that were very popular at the time. Arthur years to receive some kind of message from his deceased wife, Stella. A couple of days into his work, Arthur sees a woman dressed in black in the cemetery and goes to explore. Daily talks with Arthur about spiritualism and debunks the practice, but Daily’s wife is a believer. She sees things.
 
And children begin dying all around Arthur. He is greatly distraught and wants to stop his son and the nanny from coming north.
 
“The Woman in Black” is an atmospheric, gothic horror novel based on the 1983 book by Susan Hill.  It is produced by Hammer Film Productions, founded in England in 1935, sold in the 80s and now starting up again. When I was studying in England Hammer films were always being talked about, especially in relation to the underground railways.
 
In “Woman in Black”, the train is highly symbolic and plays a key role.
 
This is a film about grief and love, it is about mental illness and who decides who is ill or not. In some warped way, when Arthur tries to set the universe aright to appease the woman in black, she returns the favor.  And it is not all that upsetting except to the living. The story also has a terrible Pied Piper quality about it because vengeance for an original crime is the real horror.
  “The Woman in Black” is well scripted, acted, and filmed. But is it horror or about the power of love? Can they be the same?


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Wolfgang of Regensburg: Wolfgang was born in Swabia, Germany, and was educated at a school located at the abbey of Reichenau. There he encountered Henry, a young noble who went on to become Archbishop of Trier. Meanwhile, Wolfgang remained in close contact with the archbishop, teaching in his cathedral school and supporting his efforts to reform the clergy. 
<p>At the death of the archbishop, Wolfgang chose to become a Benedictine monk and moved to an abbey in Einsiedeln, now part of Switzerland. Ordained a priest, he was appointed director of the monastery school there. Later he was sent to Hungary as a missionary, though his zeal and good will yielded limited results. </p><p>Emperor Otto II appointed him Bishop of Regensburg near Munich. He immediately initiated reform of the clergy and of religious life, preaching with vigor and effectiveness and always demonstrating special concern for the poor. He wore the habit of a monk and lived an austere life. </p><p>The draw to monastic life never left him, including the desire for a life of solitude. At one point he left his diocese so that he could devote himself to prayer, but his responsibilities as bishop called him back. </p><p>In 994 Wolfgang became ill while on a journey; he died in Puppingen near Linz, Austria. He was canonized in 1052. His feast day is celebrated widely in much of central Europe. </p> American Catholic Blog Keep your gaze always on our most beloved Jesus, asking him in the depths of his heart what he desires for you, and never deny him anything even if it means going strongly against the grain for you. –Blessed Maria Sagrario of St. Aloysius Gonzaga

 
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