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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Undefeated

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Manassas High School in North Memphis, TN opened in 1899 and for 110 years never made it to the playoffs, never mind a championship. When the major employer closed, the neighborhood, if you could call it that, fell into further decay. Abandoned decrepit houses dot the landscape.
 
The African-American families that sent their sons and grandsons to Manassas were almost all headed by women. Adult African-American men seem to be few in North Memphis.
 
The current school building is beautiful but without resources for sports, equipment uniforms. To pay for the football program the Manassas Tigers would accept exhibition matches with successful high school programs in distant towns, knowing they would lose in a spectacular manner, but return home with a check that would help the program limp along for another year.
 
Then in 2004 Bill Courtney, a white guy that owned his own company, married and the father of four, volunteered to coach. Raised by a single mother because his dad left the family when he was four years old, Bill shared a common experience with these young men, some filled with anger, some academically challenged, and some just good kids playing football as a way out of North Memphis.
 
When I received the invitation to this film I groaned, “No, not another football movie.” I did not enter the screening room with a good attitude. But within two minutes I was hooked. “Undefeated” is not a movie about football, it’s a beautiful documentary about love, brotherhood, community, education, forgiveness, prayer, respect, humility, character, faith, and yes, beating one another to pulp over some inflated pigskin.
 
The coach tells the story here, especially about three boys: O.C., a 300 lb left tackle, Chavis the unpredictable angry kid who is just returning from 15 months in a youth penitentiary, and Money. He is really too small to play college ball, but he is all heart. He tears something in his knee early on and must sit out the season – almost.
 
The film has a “Blind Side” vibe to it because college scouts get a look at O.C. In one day he received what looked like a dozen offers from colleges. But academically, he was struggling. Another assistant coach asks his grandmother if he can stay with his family 3-4 nights a week and he will pay for a tutor. The coaches get a lot of push back for white guys helping one black kid, but the coach explains: when you see a kid with so much talent and heart, no matter who he is, you just want to help him succeed.
 
I cannot really express how deeply this film touched me. Not only Coach Courtney and his family, but the team, and the larger community.
 
This film is about gifts: the ones we share, the one’s we receive, and the ones we never see coming.
 
Don’t miss this film.


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Cornelius: 
		<p>There was no pope for 14 months after the martyrdom of St. Fabian because of the intensity of the persecution of the Church. During the interval, the Church was governed by a college of priests. St. Cyprian, a friend of Cornelius, writes that Cornelius was elected pope "by the judgment of God and of Christ, by the testimony of most of the clergy, by the vote of the people, with the consent of aged priests and of good men." </p>
		<p>The greatest problem of Cornelius's two-year term as pope had to do with the Sacrament of Penance and centered on the readmission of Christians who had denied their faith during the time of persecution. Two extremes were finally both condemned. Cyprian, primate of North Africa, appealed to the pope to confirm his stand that the relapsed could be reconciled only by the decision of the bishop. </p>
		<p>In Rome, however, Cornelius met with the opposite view. After his election, a priest named Novatian (one of those who had governed the Church) had himself consecrated a rival bishop of Rome—one of the first antipopes. He denied that the Church had any power to reconcile not only the apostates, but also those guilty of murder, adultery, fornication or second marriage! Cornelius had the support of most of the Church (especially of Cyprian of Africa) in condemning Novatianism, though the sect persisted for several centuries. Cornelius held a synod at Rome in 251 and ordered the "relapsed" to be restored to the Church with the usual "medicines of repentance." </p>
		<p>The friendship of Cornelius and Cyprian was strained for a time when one of Cyprian's rivals made accusations about him. But the problem was cleared up. </p>
		<p>A document from Cornelius shows the extent of organization in the Church of Rome in the mid-third century: 46 priests, seven deacons, seven subdeacons. It is estimated that the number of Christians totaled about 50,000. </p>
		<p>Cornelius died as a result of the hardships of his exile in what is now Civitavecchia (near Rome). <br /> </p>
American Catholic Blog For God judged it better to bring good out of evil than not to permit any evil to exist. —St. Augustine

 
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