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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Haywire

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org


Mallory Kane (Gina Carano) sits in a rural diner waiting for someone but the wrong man comes in, Aaron (Channing Tatum). She says “Barcelona” and beats him off when he tries  to make her go with him. She escapes by carjacking a vehicle with a young man, Scott (Michael Angarano) in it and takes him for the ride of his life. As they race away she begins telling him a story that he is to repeat to the police, the newspaper, anyone who will listen, should anything happen to her.
 
Mallory works for a military corporation contracted to the U.S. government. The company is headed by Kenneth (Ewan McGregor) and the U.S. government is represented by Coblenz (Michael Douglas). Mallory wants out but takes one last job in Barcelona. She and her team succeed in rescuing a Chinese dissident but it becomes evident soon after that she is the  target for elimination and everything else is a an elaborate ruse to do so. Her whole world goes haywire.
 
“Haywire” could have been the usual spy-traitor-revenge story but it was riveting as a survival self-defense story. Cina Carrano is a Mixed Martial Arts expert and has appeared often on “American Gladiator”. She’s very credible in this intense adventure role. Bill Paxton plays her father, a former Marine who writes spy thrillers from his retreat in New Mexico.  He understands his daughter perfectly.
 
Director Steven Soderbergh never makes a frivolous movie. Here, using a tight script written by Lem Dobbs, he makes a case for the precarious ethical union between the U.S. government and the military industry that is unregulated, extremely profitable, and thriving.
 
Innocent people get killed when greed, ambition and power go unchecked. If you go a step further the film is stating quite clearly that these are our tax dollars at work.
 
Is Mallory getting her revenge or is she defending her life? I think Soderbergh makes a good case for self-defense in this new world order of war at any price.


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Mark: Most of what we know about Mark comes directly from the New Testament. He is usually identified with the Mark of Acts 12:12. (When Peter escaped from prison, he went to the home of Mark's mother.) 
<p>Paul and Barnabas took him along on the first missionary journey, but for some reason Mark returned alone to Jerusalem. It is evident, from Paul's refusal to let Mark accompany him on the second journey despite Barnabas's insistence, that Mark had displeased Paul. Because Paul later asks Mark to visit him in prison, we may assume the trouble did not last long. </p><p>The oldest and the shortest of the four Gospels, the Gospel of Mark emphasizes Jesus' rejection by humanity while being God's triumphant envoy. Probably written for Gentile converts in Rome—after the death of Peter and Paul sometime between A.D. 60 and 70—Mark's Gospel is the gradual manifestation of a "scandal": a crucified Messiah. </p><p>Evidently a friend of Mark (Peter called him "my son"), Peter is only one of the Gospel sources, others being the Church in Jerusalem (Jewish roots) and the Church at Antioch (largely Gentile). </p><p>Like one other Gospel writer, Luke, Mark was not one of the 12 apostles. We cannot be certain whether he knew Jesus personally. Some scholars feel that the evangelist is speaking of himself when describing the arrest of Jesus in Gethsemane: "Now a young man followed him wearing nothing but a linen cloth about his body. They seized him, but he left the cloth behind and ran off naked" (Mark 14:51-52). </p><p>Others hold Mark to be the first bishop of Alexandria, Egypt. Venice, famous for the Piazza San Marco, claims Mark as its patron saint; the large basilica there is believed to contain his remains. </p><p>A winged lion is Mark's symbol. The lion derives from Mark's description of John the Baptist as a "voice of one crying out in the desert" (Mark 1:3), which artists compared to a roaring lion. The wings come from the application of Ezekiel's vision of four winged creatures (Ezekiel, chapter one) to the evangelists.</p> American Catholic Blog Our Father’s love can be summed up in one word: Jesus! Throughout history, God has reached out to His people with unconditional love. This love reached its climax when He sent His Son to become our redeemer.


 
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