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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Carnage

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Picture yourself in a small apartment in Brooklyn, one where you could look out the window and see Manhattan. Then picture yourself watching the action in the tiny apartment unfold on stage.
 
Nancy (Kate Winslet) and Alan (Christof Waltz) Cowan are visiting Penelope (Jodie Foster) and Michael (John C. Rielly) Longstreet in that small apartment. The sons of these two sets of parents have had a fight.  The parents are agreeing that the Cowen boy was the aggressor who hit the other boy and knocked out two teeth.
 
The middle class Longstreets are trying to be very civil and polite. Penelope is the moral voice of the film that continually struggles for higher ground; she is writing a book about Dafur because she cares so much. The upper crust Cowans, especially Alan, continually takes calls on his mobile phone during the conversation, irritating everyone. The Cowans try to leave two or three times but end up being drawn back into the spider’s web when they couples disagree about right and wrong between their children, Alan’s unethical tactics as a pharmaceutical executive, and Michael getting rid of bothersome a pet by letting it go on the street where it could be killed.
 
I suppose a case could be made for humor at some level for the carnage left after these grown-ups duke it out with words, and the existential carnage they spew on the universe by their conflicting worldviews. But a better case might be made for the influence of Jean-Paul Sarte’s  existential tome “Nausea” on the French writer Yasmina Reza who wrote the original play “The Gods of Carnage” and co-wrote the screenplay. Indeed, when Nancy throws up all over Penelope’s fine coffee table books about art, their battlefield over meaning is completely leveled by covering beauty with vomit.
 
This is a dark comedy set in a stuffy hell created by these parents who don’t really know who they are.
 
The film had to be made in Paris because of director Roman Polanski’s ongoing trouble with the law in the United States. The acting is taut and fine by all the actors but some plays are better left to the theater. 


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Francesco Antonio Fasani: Born in Lucera (southeast Italy), Francesco entered the Conventual Franciscans in 1695. After his ordination 10 years later, he taught philosophy to younger friars, served as guardian of his friary and later became provincial. When his term of office ended, Francesco became master of novices and finally pastor in his hometown. 
<p>In his various ministries, he was loving, devout and penitential. He was a sought-after confessor and preacher. One witness at the canonical hearings regarding Francesco’s holiness testified, "In his preaching he spoke in a familiar way, filled as he was with the love of God and neighbor; fired by the Spirit, he made use of the words and deed of Holy Scripture, stirring his listeners and moving them to do penance." Francesco showed himself a loyal friend of the poor, never hesitating to seek from benefactors what was needed. </p><p>At his death in Lucera, children ran through the streets and cried out, "The saint is dead! The saint is dead!" Francesco was canonized in 1986.</p> American Catholic Blog As people of faith, we wake up with a purpose. We have a sense of mission, and this gives our lives enduring meaning. We can share with confidence the Word of God, no matter what circumstances we find ourselves in. There are no chance encounters!

 
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