AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Year of Mercy
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Shopping
Donate
Blog
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

We Bought a Zoo

By
John P. McCarthy
Source: Catholic News Service


Matt Damon and Scarlett Johansson star in a scene from the movie "We Bought a Zoo."
Of the various endangered species populating "We Bought a Zoo" (Fox), a man hoping for sufficient time to grieve his wife's death is arguably the most threatened.

Based on the real-life experiences of British writer Benjamin Mee, this amiable and ambling holiday feature puts a Capraesque twist on the notion of caretaking in the wake of loss, and has some star wattage to boost its commercial prospects. If only it didn't endorse society's expectation that "getting over" the death of a loved one must happen within a prescribed time period.

Matt Damon stars as Mee, a Los Angeles newspaper columnist struggling with his parental responsibilities six months after his wife's passing. Harried and dissatisfied with his job writing about other people's adventures, he misses his wife terribly, and finds rote expressions of sympathy unhelpful.

His precocious 7-year-old, Rosie (Maggie Elizabeth Jones), and 14-year-old son, Dylan (Colin Ford), aren't faring too well either. Rosie has trouble picturing her mother's face, and Dylan gets expelled from school, mostly for creating morbid art that expresses his anger and deep sadness.

Benjamin's brother Duncan (Thomas Haden Church) urges more human interaction, i.e., dating, but Benjamin takes a different tack. He quits his job after deciding a change of scene—and the opportunity to live their own adventure—is what the family needs. They move from the city to an 18-acre rural property that contains a ramshackle zoo. Can they fix it up, pass inspection and open for business in time for the peak season?

Trying to resuscitate Rosemoor Animal Park may well bring financial ruin and further alienate father and son. Fortunately, however, along with exotic animals the zoo comes with a staff of five humans, two of whom are potential love interests for the Mee males—head keeper Kelly (Scarlett Johansson) and vivacious teen Lily (Elle Fanning).

As is only to be expected from former music journalist-turned-helmer Cameron Crowe ("Almost Famous" and "Jerry Maguire"), the soundtrack utilizes plenty of rock- 'n'-roll ballads. Crowe's direction is easygoing, and the script he co-wrote with Aline Brosh McKenna doesn't belabor the peril or the romantic possibilities. Attempts at zany humor never really hit their mark, though Haden Church gives it his best. Not overly glossy by Hollywood standards, it's a tame picture with minimal conflict. There's little doubt all will turn out well.

Potentially chafing to Catholic viewers is a parallel storyline about a Bengal tiger. Benjamin's instinct is to nurse the regal animal, which is dying of natural causes. But the argument is vehemently made that the humane and moral course of action is to end the creature's suffering by hastening its death. This unquestioned assumption, and the way it mirrors the widower's coming to grips with his primary loss, reminds us we're part of a culture whose prevailing attitudes toward life and death must be carefully parsed.

These three points notwithstanding, "We Bought a Zoo" is commendable entertainment—not least because it emphasizes the importance of hard work in achieving anything of value, whether therapeutic or zoological.

The film contains at least one instance of profanity, several uses of crude and crass language, some lightly suggestive banter and a few morbid images. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG—parental guidance suggested. Some material may not be suitable for children.

*****
McCarthy is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.





Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Joseph Benedict Cottolengo: In some ways Joseph exemplified St. Francis’ advice, "Let us begin to serve the Lord God, for up to now we have made little or no progress" (<i>1 Celano, </i>#103). 
<p>Joseph was the eldest of 12 children. Born in Piedmont, he was ordained for the Diocese of Turin in 1811. Frail health and difficulty in school were obstacles he overcame to reach ordination. </p><p>During Joseph’s lifetime Italy was torn by civil war while the poor and the sick suffered from neglect. Inspired by reading the life of St. Vincent de Paul and moved by the human suffering all around him, Joseph rented some rooms to nurse the sick of his parish and recruited local young women to serve as staff. </p><p>In 1832 at Voldocco, Joseph founded the House of Providence which served many different groups (the sick, the elderly, students, the mentally ill, the blind). All of this was financed by contributions. Popularly called "the University of Charity," this testimonial to God’s goodness was serving 8,000 people by the time of Joseph’s beatification in 1917. </p><p>To carry on his work, Joseph organized two religious communities, the Brothers of St. Vincent de Paul and the Sisters of St. Vincent de Paul. Joseph, who had joined the Secular Franciscans as a young man, was canonized in 1934.</p> American Catholic Blog The image of God! This is what it means to be human! We are not just a bunch of cells randomly thrown together by some impersonal forces. Rather, we reflect an eternal God who knew us from before we were made and purposely called us into being.

New Call-to-action

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Sixth Sunday of Easter
Easter is an attitude of inner joy. We are an Easter people!

St. Catherine of Siena
This 14th-century scholar combined contemplation and action in service to God and the Church.

St. Gianna Beretta Molla
This 20th-century wife and mother courageously embraced the joys and sorrows of family life.

Administrative Professionals Day
Say thanks today to those whose work makes someone else’s job a little easier.

Easter Weekday
In his rising from the dead, Jesus has given us the power to rise above ourselves.




Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic


An AmericanCatholic.org Site from the Franciscans and Franciscan Media Copyright © 1996 - 2016