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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Hugo

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

“Hugo” is based on the remarkable Caldecott Medal winning novel for young people by Brian Selznick, “The Invention of Hugo Carbet” (2007). The book itself is a joy to read, a celebration of the power of the imagination and the magic of the movies.

The film adaptation is director Martin Scorsese’s passionate “hommage” to storytelling through cinema. It was written by John Logan, who is not a consistently good writer (he was nominated for Oscars for “Gladiator” and “The Aviator” but he also wrote “The Last Samurai” and “Rango”, that while entertaining, were lacking in plot development) but he has done a wonderful job here.

“Hugo” is the story of Hugo Carbet, a young orphan boy who lives in a Paris train station in 1930. Hugo’s father (Jude Law), a curator at a museum who is fascinated by an automaton, has died. Hugo’s Uncle Claude (Ray Winstone) comes to fetch him and the boy manages to grab his father’s notebook and the robot as he leaves.

When Uncle Claude disappears, Hugo keeps the clocks on time, helps himself to food around the station and comes to the attention of a station inspector (Sasha Baron Cohen). The owner of a stand that repairs and sells mechanical toys, an older man (Ben Kingsley) also notices Hugo trying to lift a toy and takes his notebook. He then hires Hugo to repair toys.

The stand owner turns out to be Georges Méliès, (1861-1938),  a former magician, and the first filmmaker to make fantasy science fiction films. His  “La Voyage Dans la Lune” can be seen in various lengths on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Kpnbl3tn58 and is included in “Hugo”.   This information may seem like a “spoiler” but I think knowing it before seeing the film, especially if you are not familiar with film history, will add to your experience.

Méliès, made hundreds of films between 1897 and 1914 when he stopped because people preferred the ”realism” of the films of the Lumiere Brothers, who are credited with  inventing cinema, though now they are referred to  as being among the first  inventors., including Thomas Edison. Their  “Arrival of a Train”   is included in “Hugo” and can be seen on YouTube as well http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dgLEDdFddk. This short film revolutionized society, that is, the way people came together in a shared experience of a story in ways never before experienced. Going to movies became an industry (Georges tells the story of his studio and how the studio workers, mostly women, made color film by paining each frame one by one. This is an amazing feat of creativity and intense, painstaking labor when you consider that film moves at 24 frames per second.)

Méliès wife, Mama Jeanne is played well by Helen McCrory and their ward, Isabelle (Chloë Grace Moretz), is the courageous girl who befriends Hugo, who brings everyone together.

What makes “Hugo” so special to me is that Martin Scorsese made it and it is filled with the afterimage of his Catholicism and imbued with his passion for cinema. This is evident in the visuals as well as the attitude toward the arts, storytelling, family, and the honor he gives to the imagination. In an era when literal interpretation is the driving method for understanding stories, news, and often scripture, a method that dries up dreams and ignores the imagination, “Hugo” is a gift to all of us.

I found myself profoundly moved by the film and at one point, I just started crying for the sheer joy of seeing the creative imagination validated.  If we  approach the film intentionally, willing to wait for the story to unfold, to savor the blend of sight and sound, to become a curious child again, to become seekers again, we, too, will be rewarded, just like Hugo.


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Ignatius of Loyola: The founder of the Jesuits was on his way to military fame and fortune when a cannon ball shattered his leg. Because there were no books of romance on hand during his convalescence, Ignatius whiled away the time reading a life of Christ and lives of the saints. His conscience was deeply touched, and a long, painful turning to Christ began. Having seen the Mother of God in a vision, he made a pilgrimage to her shrine at Montserrat (near Barcelona). He remained for almost a year at nearby Manresa, sometimes with the Dominicans, sometimes in a pauper’s hospice, often in a cave in the hills praying. After a period of great peace of mind, he went through a harrowing trial of scruples. There was no comfort in anything—prayer, fasting, sacraments, penance. At length, his peace of mind returned. 
<p>It was during this year of conversion that Ignatius began to write down material that later became his greatest work, the <em>Spiritual Exercises</em>. </p><p>He finally achieved his purpose of going to the Holy Land, but could not remain, as he planned, because of the hostility of the Turks. He spent the next 11 years in various European universities, studying with great difficulty, beginning almost as a child. Like many others, his orthodoxy was questioned; Ignatius was twice jailed for brief periods. </p><p>In 1534, at the age of 43, he and six others (one of whom was St. Francis Xavier, December 2) vowed to live in poverty and chastity and to go to the Holy Land. If this became impossible, they vowed to offer themselves to the apostolic service of the pope. The latter became the only choice. Four years later Ignatius made the association permanent. The new Society of Jesus was approved by Paul III, and Ignatius was elected to serve as the first general. </p><p>When companions were sent on various missions by the pope, Ignatius remained in Rome, consolidating the new venture, but still finding time to found homes for orphans, catechumens and penitents. He founded the Roman College, intended to be the model of all other colleges of the Society. </p><p>Ignatius was a true mystic. He centered his spiritual life on the essential foundations of Christianity—the Trinity, Christ, the Eucharist. His spirituality is expressed in the Jesuit motto, <i>ad majorem Dei gloriam</i>—“for the greater glory of God.” In his concept, obedience was to be the prominent virtue, to assure the effectiveness and mobility of his men. All activity was to be guided by a true love of the Church and unconditional obedience to the Holy Father, for which reason all professed members took a fourth vow to go wherever the pope should send them for the salvation of souls.</p> American Catholic Blog Jesus’s humanity and His biological need to be fed Himself gives power and personal force to His teaching that when we feed the hungry and give drink to the thirsty, we do it to Him.

 
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