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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

My Week With Marilyn

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


Dougray Scott and Michelle Williams star in "My Week With Marilyn."
Nearly 50 years after her 1962 death, Marilyn Monroe continues to fascinate, with every detail of her often troubled life and loves endlessly dissected and analyzed. The latest treatment is "My Week With Marilyn" (Weinstein), a behind-the-scenes story of the making of one of Monroe's least successful films, "The Prince and the Showgirl" (1956).

Based on the 1995 memoir by Colin Clark, "My Week With Marilyn" presents the true story of the author's unexpected friendship with the actress during the film's production in London. What emerges is a sympathetic portrayal of a tortured, complicated soul, a woman who wanted only to be loved but, in the end, needed love too much.

"Everyone remembers their first job. This is the story of mine," says Colin (Eddie Redmayne) as the film opens. And what a job! Eager to escape his privileged British upbringing and break into movies, the 23-year-old looks up a couple of family friends who happen to be acting royalty: husband and wife, Laurence Olivier (Kenneth Branagh) and Vivien Leigh (Julia Ormond).

Colin lands a job as a gofer on Olivier's directorial debut, which pairs the distinguished actor with Monroe (Michelle Williams), the biggest movie star in the world.

Each partner in this unlikely collaboration has an ulterior motive. Olivier, middle-aged and past his acting prime, is eager for a comeback -- and perhaps an affair with his voluptuous co-star. Thirty-year-old Marilyn seeks prestige from Olivier and desperately wants to be taken seriously as an actress. At her side is her method acting coach, Paula Strasberg (Zoe Wanamaker), who needles Marilyn to "feel" the role and "become" the character.

What ensues is a clash of titans—and cultures—as the set becomes a battleground. It's staid Brit versus free-spirited Yank, old guard versus young gun, tradition versus wild abandon.

Olivier, a strict disciplinarian, is driven to despair as Marilyn, dependent on pills and alcohol, withdraws. "Trying to teach Marilyn Monroe how to act is like trying to teach Urdu to a badger," he moans.

Salvation comes in the form of the innocent but smitten Colin, who longs to protect the star from the sniping establishment.

"You should get out more. See the sights," he tells her.

"I am the sights," Marilyn responds.

Nonetheless, with her third husband, Arthur Miller (Dougray Scott), out of town, Marilyn whisks Colin away for week in the country. In him she finds a kindred spirit, not a lover, and she musters the energy to stand up to Olivier and complete the picture.

As the insecure yet headstrong starlet, Williams turns in a bravura performance that goes beyond mere impersonation to something more genuine. She portrays Marilyn as a victim, surrounded by hangers-on who ply her with drugs, and a husband who scribbles cruel notes about her behind her back. Yet, in the end, she manages to take control and have the last laugh.

Directed by newcomer Simon Curtis, "My Week With Marilyn" is surprisingly chaste and free of exploitative intent, a handful of stolen (admittedly adulterous) kisses and two glimpses of Monroe's backside notwithstanding. This is primarily Colin's story, the tale of a decent man more interested in protecting the underdog ("She needs a chum," he tells Olivier) than bedding or victimizing her.

The film contains fleeting rear female nudity, brief adulterous kissing, a few profane expressions and some rough language. The Catholic News Service classification is A-III—adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

*****
Joseph McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Fidelis of Sigmaringen: If a poor man needed some clothing, Fidelis would often give the man the clothes right off his back. Complete generosity to others characterized this saint's life. 
<p>Born in 1577, Mark Rey (Fidelis was his religious name) became a lawyer who constantly upheld the causes of the poor and oppressed people. Nicknamed "the poor man's lawyer," Fidelis soon grew disgusted with the corruption and injustice he saw among his colleagues. He left his law career to become a priest, joining his brother George as a member of the Capuchin Order. His wealth was divided between needy seminarians and the poor. </p><p>As a follower of Francis, Fidelis continued his devotion to the weak and needy. During a severe epidemic in a city where he was guardian of a friary, Fidelis cared for and cured many sick soldiers. </p><p>He was appointed head of a group of Capuchins sent to preach against the Calvinists and Zwinglians in Switzerland. Almost certain violence threatened. Those who observed the mission felt that success was more attributable to the prayer of Fidelis during the night than to his sermons and instructions. </p><p>He was accused of opposing the peasants' national aspirations for independence from Austria. While he was preaching at Seewis, to which he had gone against the advice of his friends, a gun was fired at him, but he escaped unharmed. A Protestant offered to shelter Fidelis, but he declined, saying his life was in God's hands. On the road back, he was set upon by a group of armed men and killed. </p><p>He was canonized in 1746. Fifteen years later, the Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith, which was established in 1622, recognized him as its first martyr.</p> American Catholic Blog Obedience means total surrender and wholehearted free service to the poorest of the poor. All the difficulties that come in our work are the result of disobedience.

 
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