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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Muppets

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

It has been twelve long years since there has been a Muppet movie.  Walter (voice of Peter Linz), a new Muppet and a huge fan of the Muppets, the world’s biggest Muppet fan, and his “brother” Gary (Jason Segel) and his girlfriend Mary (Amy Adams) plan a trip to Hollywood.
 
They visit the Muppet Studio, now in ruins. When they learn that an oil magnate  (Chris Cooper) is buying the land, a man who has no love for the Muppets, and plans to tear down the studio to drill, Walter goes into action.
 
Walter, Gary and Mary track down Kermit the Frog and convince him that they have to save the studio by putting on a musical to raise money. Then they track down Miss Piggy who heads up Vogue’s Plus Size division in Paris (in a hair style like Vogue’s Editor-in- Chief Anna Wintour), Animal, Gonzo and the rest. They must also deal with the Muppet knockoff group, the Moopets.
 
“The Muppets” is a fun musical. I loved “The Rainbow Connection” but wondered a little at the chicken’s singing a version of CeeLo Green’s “Forget You” that everyone know used a different word beginning with “f” and now the Camilla and the Chickens are singing their version. Maybe this is why the film has a PG rating for some mild rude humor.
 
There are a lot of inter-textual references, that is, inside jokes about Muppets and Hollywood, plus much music and guest appearances, including politico James Carville – twice! The film is a very enjoyable crowd pleaser.
 
Themes of friendship, community, and solidarity abound.
 
“The Muppets” signals a move from Muppet-maker Jim Henson’s original creative home in New York to Los Angeles, after all, Disney acquired The Muppet franchise in 2004.


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Martyrdom of John the Baptist: The drunken oath of a king with a shallow sense of honor, a seductive dance and the hateful heart of a queen combined to bring about the martyrdom of John the Baptist. The greatest of prophets suffered the fate of so many Old Testament prophets before him: rejection and martyrdom. The “voice crying in the desert” did not hesitate to accuse the guilty, did not hesitate to speak the truth. But why? What possesses a man that he would give up his very life? 
<p>This great religious reformer was sent by God to prepare the people for the Messiah. His vocation was one of selfless giving. The only power that he claimed was the Spirit of Yahweh. “I am baptizing you with water, for repentance, but the one who is coming after me is mightier than I. I am not worthy to carry his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire” (Matthew 3:11). Scripture tells us that many people followed John looking to him for hope, perhaps in anticipation of some great messianic power. John never allowed himself the false honor of receiving these people for his own glory. He knew his calling was one of preparation. When the time came, he led his disciples to Jesus: “The next day John was there again with two of his disciples, and as he watched Jesus walk by, he said, ‘Behold, the Lamb of God.’ The two disciples heard what he said and followed Jesus” (John 1:35-37). It is John the Baptist who has pointed the way to Christ. John’s life and death were a giving over of self for God and other people. His simple style of life was one of complete detachment from earthly possessions. His heart was centered on God and the call that he heard from the Spirit of God speaking to his heart. Confident of God’s grace, he had the courage to speak words of condemnation or repentance, of salvation.</p> American Catholic Blog Once you begin to neglect obedience, one by one everything goes. Obedience is difficult but that’s where love comes from. There are so many broken families because a woman will not obey a man and a man will not obey a woman. We belong to Jesus and obedience is our strength. You must do small acts of obedience with great love.

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