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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Tower Heist

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Whatever you think “Tower Heist” is as a film, it is really not a comedy, despite comedian Ben Stiller in the lead as Josh, the manager of a luxury condominium complex in Manhattan and the presence of Eddie Murphy as “Slide” the gangster.
 
Arthur Shaw (Alan Alda) is a millionaire financier who lives in the penthouse. The FBI arrests him for a Ponzi scheme that has robbed many people of their investments and livelihoods. Josh must admit to all the people who work at the Tower that he invested their retirement funds with Shaw, without their permission. He loses his job but along with his brother-in-law Charlie (Casey Affleck), an evicted tenant Mr. Fitzhugh (Matthew Broderick), a lock-picking housekeeper Odessa (Gabourey Sidibe), and the newly hired pseudo electrician Enrique (Michael Pena), they discover where Shaw has stashed his safety net funds.
 
I did not think this was a very funny movie but it is very clever and it has a strong moral center in a world where financial ethics are a joke. That center is Josh, who does perpetrate a heist to get their money back but uses illegal means. The FBI is ready to arrest them all but Josh provides the real treasure: information. The FBI agrees to let all his accomplices go, but Josh has to go to prison for two years. For the sake of his friends who had lost so much, he agrees to the deal. And Shaw does get arrested for his crimes.
 
The film was ok but I was disappointed that it wasn’t as funny as the previews led us to believe. Heists are supposed to be improbable tales about losers outwitting the winners and this one did so with interesting characters, though it was almost impossible to understand Casey Affleck’s mumbled lines.
  The heist takes place dangling between the 40th and 50th floors I think. I really hate a heist at that height.




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Bridget: From age seven on, Bridget had visions of Christ crucified. Her visions formed the basis for her activity—always with the emphasis on charity rather than spiritual favors. 
<p>She lived her married life in the court of the Swedish king Magnus II. Mother of eight children (the second eldest was St. Catherine of Sweden), she lived the strict life of a penitent after her husband’s death. </p><p>Bridget constantly strove to exert her good influence over Magnus; while never fully reforming, he did give her land and buildings to found a monastery for men and women. This group eventually expanded into an Order known as the Bridgetines (still in existence). </p><p>In 1350, a year of jubilee, Bridget braved a plague-stricken Europe to make a pilgrimage to Rome. Although she never returned to Sweden, her years in Rome were far from happy, being hounded by debts and by opposition to her work against Church abuses. </p><p>A final pilgrimage to the Holy Land, marred by shipwreck and the death of her son, Charles, eventually led to her death in 1373. In 1999, she, Saints Catherine of Siena (April 29) and Teresa Benedicts of the Cross (Edith Stein, August 9) were named co-patronesses of Europe.</p> American Catholic Blog Teaching by example forms a durable base from which to form character. It is the base, but alone it won’t raise the kind of person you want. Being a moral adult is fundamental to teaching children morals. But it is not sufficient, in and of itself.

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