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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

The Thing

By
John P. McCarthy
Source: Catholic News Service

"The Thing" (Universal) is billed as a prequel to horror specialist John Carpenter's 1982 movie of the same name. Carpenter's celebrated film was itself a remake of the 1951 classic "The Thing From Another World," produced by Howard Hawks. And that influential picture was, in turn, based on the science-fiction novella "Who Goes There?" penned by John W. Campbell Jr. and published under a pseudonym in 1938.

As complicated and promising as this pedigree may sound, the resulting creature feature is too simplistic to sate eager horror buffs or hook new audiences. Because it doesn't add any conceptual layers to the bare bones of the narrative or break any new technical ground, "The Thing" can be classified as "adequate but unnecessary." It delivers enough frights to avoid dishonoring the franchise.

From a moral perspective, the gory images and vulgar language contained in the homage aren't disqualifying when considered in context. The former are, so to speak, the nature of the beast.

One winter's day in 1982, Columbia University paleontologist Dr. Kate Lloyd (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) is recruited for an emergency mission to Antarctica where Norwegian researchers have discovered an alien buried inside a glacier.

Determined to keep their startling find a secret, team leader Dr. Sander Halvorson (Ulrich Thomsen) disregards Kate's advice and authorizes a test that leads to the creature's escape.

Intent on replicating itself, the crab-like extraterrestrial begins preying violently on the dozen or so occupants of Thule Station. As a storm approaches and terror grips the isolated outpost, it's up to Kate and American helicopter pilot Sam Carter (Joel Edgerton) to contain the damage.

Dutch director Matthijs van Heijningen makes little attempt to deepen the thematic subtext or exploit the inherently menacing atmosphere. His goal seems to be to showcase the forensic clarity of the visual effects depicting the alien. As visceral as they are, they're often overwhelmed by blaring sound effects and music, a sign the filmmaker doesn't have total confidence in the power of his images to scare moviegoers.

On the plus side, the screenplay never wanders off track and resolutely spotlights a female protagonist possessed of equal parts fortitude and smarts—along with, quite possibly, some alien DNA.

The drama flows from the group's instinctual responses toward their survival predicament, particularly their suspicion of one another given that the parasitic monster adopts the form of the people he consumes.

Trust is in short supply, and while the movie isn't the best exemplar of that trait, the humanity of the characters does remain intact, although barely. In other words, "The Thing" doesn't qualify as an egregious recycling of a touchstone. And, though many will find it unsettling, its shortcomings don't amount to a crime against cinema, good taste or decency.

The film contains frequent intense, gory creature violence, an implied suicide, some profanity, much rough, crude and crass language and a lewd reference to incest.

The Catholic News Service classification is L—limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

- - -

McCarthy is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Bernard of Clairvaux: Man of the century! Woman of the century! You see such terms applied to so many today—“golfer of the century,” “composer of the century,” “right tackle of the century”—that the line no longer has any punch. But Western Europe's “man of the twelfth century,” without doubt or controversy, has to be Bernard of Clairvaux. Adviser of popes, preacher of the Second Crusade, defender of the faith, healer of a schism, reformer of a monastic Order, Scripture scholar, theologian and eloquent preacher: any one of these titles would distinguish an ordinary man. Yet Bernard was all of these—and he still retained a burning desire to return to the hidden monastic life of his younger days. 
<p>In the year 1111, at the age of 20, Bernard left his home to join the monastic community of Citeaux. His five brothers, two uncles and some 30 young friends followed him into the monastery. Within four years a dying community had recovered enough vitality to establish a new house in the nearby valley of Wormwoods, with Bernard as abbot. The zealous young man was quite demanding, though more on himself than others. A slight breakdown of health taught him to be more patient and understanding. The valley was soon renamed Clairvaux, the valley of light. </p><p>His ability as arbitrator and counselor became widely known. More and more he was lured away from the monastery to settle long-standing disputes. On several of these occasions he apparently stepped on some sensitive toes in Rome. Bernard was completely dedicated to the primacy of the Roman See. But to a letter of warning from Rome, he replied that the good fathers in Rome had enough to do to keep the Church in one piece. If any matters arose that warranted their interest, he would be the first to let them know. </p><p>Shortly thereafter it was Bernard who intervened in a full-blown schism and settled it in favor of the Roman pontiff against the antipope. </p><p>The Holy See prevailed on Bernard to preach the Second Crusade throughout Europe. His eloquence was so overwhelming that a great army was assembled and the success of the crusade seemed assured. The ideals of the men and their leaders, however, were not those of Abbot Bernard, and the project ended as a complete military and moral disaster. </p><p>Bernard felt responsible in some way for the degenerative effects of the crusade. This heavy burden possibly hastened his death, which came August 20, 1153.</p> American Catholic Blog One of the things that we need to remember is that we’re preaching Jesus, not the institutional Church. It’s easy to get caught up in the rules and regulations of the institution and forget that we are saved not by the Church but by the person of Jesus or the Church as the body of Christ.

 
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