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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Dolphin Tale

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

Dolphin Tale, starring Ashley Judd and Harry Connick, Jr., is based on the inspiring true story of Winter, a bottlenose dolphin who lost her tail in a crab trap off the coast of Florida. She was rescued and fitted with a prosthetic tail at the Clearwater Marine Aquarium. It was not an easy task as she had already learned to swim in a way that, unless helped, would eventually cripple her further.

Dolphin Tale parallels Winter’s story with that of two children of single parents, and a returning soldier wounded in Iraq. Although the film is in 3D, the story is beautiful in its simplicity. The courage of some of the children who visit Winter goes right for the heart.

The film shows how Winter is an inspiration to veterans as well as to children with disabilities. I was also moved by the sacrifices that parents make for their children with special needs. There’s one scene in the film where a mom arrives with her little daughter who cannot walk… they had driven hundreds of miles and the aquarium was closed. Of course they opened it for them, but you might need a Kleenex for that moment.




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Philip and James: 
		<b>James, Son of Alphaeus:</b> We know nothing of this man except his name, and of course the fact that Jesus chose him to be one of the 12 pillars of the New Israel, his Church. He is not the James of Acts, son of Clopas, “brother” of Jesus and later bishop of Jerusalem and the traditional author of the Letter of James. James, son of Alphaeus, is also known as James the Lesser to avoid confusing him with James the son of Zebedee, also an apostle and known as James the Greater. 
<p><b>Philip:</b> Philip came from the same town as Peter and Andrew, Bethsaida in Galilee. Jesus called him directly, whereupon he sought out Nathanael and told him of the “one about whom Moses wrote” (John 1:45). </p><p>Like the other apostles, Philip took a long time coming to realize who Jesus was. On one occasion, when Jesus saw the great multitude following him and wanted to give them food, he asked Philip where they should buy bread for the people to eat. St. John comments, “[Jesus] said this to test him, because he himself knew what he was going to do” (John 6:6). Philip answered, “Two hundred days’ wages worth of food would not be enough for each of them to have a little [bit]” (John 6:7). </p><p>John’s story is not a put-down of Philip. It was simply necessary for these men who were to be the foundation stones of the Church to see the clear distinction between humanity’s total helplessness apart from God and the human ability to be a bearer of divine power by God’s gift. </p><p>On another occasion, we can almost hear the exasperation in Jesus’ voice. After Thomas had complained that they did not know where Jesus was going, Jesus said, “I am the way...If you know me, then you will also know my Father. From now on you do know him and have seen him” (John 14:6a, 7). Then Philip said, “Master, show us the Father, and that will be enough for us” (John 14:8). Enough! Jesus answered, “Have I been with you for so long a time and you still do not know me, Philip? Whoever has seen me has seen the Father” (John 14:9a). </p><p>Possibly because Philip bore a Greek name or because he was thought to be close to Jesus, some Gentile proselytes came to him and asked him to introduce them to Jesus. Philip went to Andrew, and Andrew went to Jesus. Jesus’ reply in John’s Gospel is indirect; Jesus says that now his “hour” has come, that in a short time he will give his life for Jew and Gentile alike.</p> American Catholic Blog Only in human weakness do many of us begin to rely on God and explicitly repudiate our own divine ambitions. Every pain alerts us to the fact that we are not the Almighty.

Divine Science Michael Dennin

 
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