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Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service

NEW YORK (CNS) -- You'll need a good road map to navigate the plot twists and turns of "Drive" (FilmDistrict), a dark, introspective drama about a self-absorbed loner who lives for the open road but unexpectedly finds his conscience along the way.

Despite stylish direction from Nicolas Winding Refn ("Valhalla Rising"), "Drive" ultimately suffers from an identity crisis, unable to decide whether it is an action movie, a love story, a slasher film or a morality tale. Turns out it's a little bit of everything.

Ryan Gosling portrays the driver, who is aptly called Driver, a man of few words but master of the long, penetrating stare. His coolness quotient is off the charts, reminiscent of a young Steve McQueen.

By day, Driver has two jobs: He's a stunt car driver for action movies, and he fixes cars at the auto body shop run by Shannon (Bryan Cranston).

By night, Driver and Shannon show their true colors, running heists around Los Angeles. Driver is the getaway driver, considered the best in the business.

His wheels? A souped-up Chevy Impala. "It's the most common car in California," Shannon says. "No one will be looking for it."

Not content with petty crime, Shannon buys a race car, and is determined to make Driver a star. He seeks the backing of two mob bosses, Bernie Rose (Albert Brooks), a washed-up film producer, and Nino (Ron Perlman), whose Italian restaurant (which serves Chinese food) is a front for organized crime. Soon, Shannon learns that neither mobster is particularly interested in an honest living on the NASCAR circuit.

Meanwhile, "Drive" shifts gears, as Driver takes notice of his new high-rise neighbor, Irene (Carey Mulligan), and her adorable son, Benicio (Kaden Leos). Something stirs in Driver, and soon he is part of the family, experiencing a kind of domestic bliss. Good thing Irene's husband, Standard (Oscar Isaac), is away in prison.

Just when "Drive" should be heading off into a happily-ever-after (if immoral) sunset, the film takes another turn. Standard is sprung and comes home, determined to make life better for his family. One thing, though: He still owes the mob money, and is beaten to a pulp. Driver takes pity on him, and offers to arrange one last heist, which will raise enough to put Standard and his family on the straight and narrow.

Of course, the road to redemption is never straight, and "Drive" takes off in yet another unexpected—and shocking—direction.

"Drive" is determined to make Driver, despite his flaws, a sympathetic character. While his concern for innocent victims is laudable, the violence he uses to exact justice is not. His moral compass is badly skewed and veers him off the correct path.

The film contains brutal bloody violence and gore, upper female nudity and frequent rough language. The Catholic News Service classification is O—morally offensive. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R—restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

Joseph McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.

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Marie-Rose Durocher: Canada was one diocese from coast to coast during the first eight years of Marie-Rose Durocher’s life. Its half-million Catholics had received civil and religious liberty from the English only 44 years before. When Marie-Rose was 29, Bishop Ignace Bourget became bishop of Montreal. He would be a decisive influence in her life. 
<p>He faced a shortage of priests and sisters and a rural population that had been largely deprived of education. Like his counterparts in the United States, he scoured Europe for help and himself founded four communities, one of which was the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary. Its first sister and reluctant co-foundress was Marie-Rose. </p><p>She was born in a little village near Montreal in 1811, the 10th of 11 children. She had a good education, was something of a tomboy, rode a horse named Caesar and could have married well. At 16, she felt the desire to become a religious but was forced to abandon the idea because of her weak constitution. At 18, when her mother died, her priest brother invited her and her father to come to his parish in Beloeil, not far from Montreal. For 13 years she served as housekeeper, hostess and parish worker. She became well known for her graciousness, courtesy, leadership and tact; she was, in fact, called “the saint of Beloeil.” Perhaps she was too tactful during two years when her brother treated her coldly. </p><p>As a young woman she had hoped there would someday be a community of teaching sisters in every parish, never thinking she would found one. But her spiritual director, Father Pierre Telmon, O.M.I., after thoroughly (and severely) leading her in the spiritual life, urged her to found a community herself. Bishop Bourget concurred, but Marie-Rose shrank from the prospect. She was in poor health and her father and her brother needed her. </p><p>She finally agreed and, with two friends, Melodie Dufresne and Henriette Cere, entered a little home in Longueuil, across the Saint Lawrence River from Montreal. With them were 13 young girls already assembled for boarding school. Longueuil became successively her Bethlehem, Nazareth and Gethsemani. She was 32 and would live only six more years—years filled with poverty, trials, sickness and slander. The qualities she had nurtured in her “hidden” life came forward—a strong will, intelligence and common sense, great inner courage and yet a great deference to directors. Thus was born an international congregation of women religious dedicated to education in the faith. </p><p>She was severe with herself and by today’s standards quite strict with her sisters. Beneath it all, of course, was an unshakable love of her crucified Savior. </p><p>On her deathbed the prayers most frequently on her lips were “Jesus, Mary, Joseph! Sweet Jesus, I love you. Jesus, be to me Jesus!” Before she died, she smiled and said to the sister with her, “Your prayers are keeping me here—let me go.” </p><p>She was beatified in 1982.</p> American Catholic Blog It is in them [the saints] that Christian love becomes credible; they are the poor sinners’ guiding stars. But every one of them wishes to point completely away from himself and toward love…. The genuine saints desired nothing but the greater glory of God’s love… <br />—Hans Urs von Balthasar

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