AmericanCatholic.org
 
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Catholic News
Saints
Seasonal
Special Reports
Movies
Shopping
Donate
Share:
Facebook
Twitter
Google Plus
LinkedIn
Email
RSS Feeds
ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Warrior

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

In the universe of sports films “Warrior” is unique because the subject is fighting for a spiritual goal through Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), a “full contact combat” sport. This relatively new sport, though some contend it does not qualify as such, is a fusion of boxing, wrestling, judo and other sports. (See the article on Mixed Martial Arts on Wikipedia; it’s pretty thorough http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mixed_martial_arts). The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) that promotes MMA worldwide.

A young man Tom (Tom Hardy) shows up at his dad’s house after fourteen years. At the height of Paddy’s (Nick Nolte) alcoholism, Tom and his mom left, leaving  his older brother Brendan (Joel Edgerton) to survive with Paddy, a boxing coach. Tom even takes his mom’s maiden name, Riordan. When their mom died Tom joined the marines. Just back from Afghanistan, Tom wants his dad to train him for the UFC.  Paddy, now sober for 1000 days, agrees. This doesn’t mean Tom has forgiven Paddy, and Paddy is still working on forgiving himself.
 
Brendan is a successful high school teacher, married with children. He will have nothing to do with Paddy. Brendan and Tom refuse to reconcile as well. When Brendan’s home goes into foreclosure, he returns to boxing and tried MMA. His school fires him for a local fight. And soon both brothers, and their dad, are in Atlantic City for the championship match, winner take all in only five rounds or less.  Both brothers have their own reasons for wanting to win the purse.
 
I interviewed director Gavin O’Connor (he directed the 2004 film “Miracle” about the famed Olympic hockey match between the US and USSR in 1980) about “Warrior”. He said that MMA “is less violent than boxing, that it’s very athletic.”  It doesn’t seem this way to me, as MMA takes place in a cage, not a ring, and going just by movies I have seen about boxing, I think MMA is far more vicious.
 
“Warrior” is about forgiveness, and if cinema is at its best when it is the external manifestation of internal realities (and I think that it is), then the intense interior struggle to forgive and reconcile with one’s brother, is portrayed in extreme passion, pain, and physical force.
 
-SPOILER ALERT-
 
The ending of the film is especially brutal because Brendan “breaks” Tommy. So I asked O’Connor to explain it to me from a male sport spirituality perspective. He said:
 
“The intention of the match is like an intervention only in a cage. Tommy needed to die at the hands of his brother in order to be reborn; he needed to surrender his anger. He is spiritually bankrupt and his breakdown, so to speak, starts when he gets his father to drink with him before the match.  And when he finally does convince him to do this as a way to get back at his father, when he wakes up and sees his dad lying there, it’s the mirror that makes him start to wake up.
 
“The fourteen years of distance between the brothers is played out in five rounds. The repairing of their relationship is dramatized because they grew up communicating through violence. What Tommy ultimately needs is to hear is, ‘I am sorry.’
 
“Tommy has so much strength of will but once his brother starts choking him and then says ‘I am sorry, I love you”, these words allow him to let go and surrender.”
 
I believe that our inner struggles with God can be extremely intense; even in the Scriptures Jacob and his brother are estranged for fourteen years and Jacob wrestles with an angel (Genesis 32:23), that some say represented Esau. The yoke was broken from Tommy’s neck, like Esau threw Jacob’s from his.
 
Jacob and Esau’s relationship with each other and their father Isaac seem like a template for “Warrior”.
 
However violent the Bible can be, I still don’t think it’s as ruthless as Mixed Martial Arts. Is MMA a way for God to get Tommy’s attention because he is so headstrong? I will let you decide.


Search reviews at CatholicMovieReviews.org


Thank you for your comments. Editors will review all posts before they are visible on the website.

blog comments powered by Disqus







Pius X: Pope Pius X is perhaps best remembered for his encouragement of the frequent reception of Holy Communion, especially by children. 
<p>The second of 10 children in a poor Italian family, Joseph Sarto became Pius X at 68, one of the 20th century’s greatest popes. </p><p>Ever mindful of his humble origin, he stated, “I was born poor, I lived poor, I will die poor.” He was embarrassed by some of the pomp of the papal court. “Look how they have dressed me up,” he said in tears to an old friend. To another, “It is a penance to be forced to accept all these practices. They lead me around surrounded by soldiers like Jesus when he was seized in Gethsemani.” </p><p>Interested in politics, he encouraged Italian Catholics to become more politically involved. One of his first papal acts was to end the supposed right of governments to interfere by veto in papal elections—a practice that reduced the freedom of the 1903 conclave which had elected him. </p><p>In 1905, when France renounced its agreement with the Holy See and threatened confiscation of Church property if governmental control of Church affairs were not granted, Pius X courageously rejected the demand. </p><p>While he did not author a famous social encyclical as his predecessor had done, he denounced the ill treatment of indigenous peoples on the plantations of Peru, sent a relief commission to Messina after an earthquake and sheltered refugees at his own expense. </p><p>On the 11th anniversary of his election as pope, Europe was plunged into World War I. Pius had foreseen it, but it killed him. “This is the last affliction the Lord will visit on me. I would gladly give my life to save my poor children from this ghastly scourge.” He died a few weeks after the war began and  was canonized in 1954.</p> American Catholic Blog If we have been saved and sustained by a love so deep that death itself couldn’t destroy it, then that love will see us through whatever darkness we are experiencing in our lives.

 
PICKS OF THE WEEK
New from Richard Rohr!

"This Franciscan message is sorely needed in the world...." -- Publishers Weekly

When the Church Was Young
Be inspired and challenged by the lives and insights of the Church's early, important teachers!
Spiritual Questions, Catholic Advice
Fr. John's advice on Catholic spiritual questions will speak to your soul and touch your heart.
New from Franciscan Media!
By reflecting on Pope Francis's example and words, you can transform your own life and relationships.
New from Servant Books!
Follow Jesus with the same kind of zeal that Paul had, guided by Mark Hart and Christopher Cuddy!

 
CATHOLIC GREETINGS
Wedding
May the Father, Son and Holy Spirit bless you in good times and in bad…
Back to School
Send them back to school with your love and prayers expressed in an e-card.
Happy Birthday
May this birthday mark the beginning of new and exciting adventures.
St. Helen
Send an e-card to remind those struggling with a broken marriage that you, God, and the Church still love and support them.
Mary's Flower - Oxeye Daisy
Show your devotion to Mary by sending an e-card in her honor.



Come find us at: Facebook | St. Anthony Messenger magazine Twitter | American Catholic YouTube | American Catholic