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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Warrior

By
Sr. Rose Pacatte, F.S.P.
Source: AmericanCatholic.org

In the universe of sports films “Warrior” is unique because the subject is fighting for a spiritual goal through Mixed Martial Arts (MMA), a “full contact combat” sport. This relatively new sport, though some contend it does not qualify as such, is a fusion of boxing, wrestling, judo and other sports. (See the article on Mixed Martial Arts on Wikipedia; it’s pretty thorough http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mixed_martial_arts). The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) that promotes MMA worldwide.

A young man Tom (Tom Hardy) shows up at his dad’s house after fourteen years. At the height of Paddy’s (Nick Nolte) alcoholism, Tom and his mom left, leaving  his older brother Brendan (Joel Edgerton) to survive with Paddy, a boxing coach. Tom even takes his mom’s maiden name, Riordan. When their mom died Tom joined the marines. Just back from Afghanistan, Tom wants his dad to train him for the UFC.  Paddy, now sober for 1000 days, agrees. This doesn’t mean Tom has forgiven Paddy, and Paddy is still working on forgiving himself.
 
Brendan is a successful high school teacher, married with children. He will have nothing to do with Paddy. Brendan and Tom refuse to reconcile as well. When Brendan’s home goes into foreclosure, he returns to boxing and tried MMA. His school fires him for a local fight. And soon both brothers, and their dad, are in Atlantic City for the championship match, winner take all in only five rounds or less.  Both brothers have their own reasons for wanting to win the purse.
 
I interviewed director Gavin O’Connor (he directed the 2004 film “Miracle” about the famed Olympic hockey match between the US and USSR in 1980) about “Warrior”. He said that MMA “is less violent than boxing, that it’s very athletic.”  It doesn’t seem this way to me, as MMA takes place in a cage, not a ring, and going just by movies I have seen about boxing, I think MMA is far more vicious.
 
“Warrior” is about forgiveness, and if cinema is at its best when it is the external manifestation of internal realities (and I think that it is), then the intense interior struggle to forgive and reconcile with one’s brother, is portrayed in extreme passion, pain, and physical force.
 
-SPOILER ALERT-
 
The ending of the film is especially brutal because Brendan “breaks” Tommy. So I asked O’Connor to explain it to me from a male sport spirituality perspective. He said:
 
“The intention of the match is like an intervention only in a cage. Tommy needed to die at the hands of his brother in order to be reborn; he needed to surrender his anger. He is spiritually bankrupt and his breakdown, so to speak, starts when he gets his father to drink with him before the match.  And when he finally does convince him to do this as a way to get back at his father, when he wakes up and sees his dad lying there, it’s the mirror that makes him start to wake up.
 
“The fourteen years of distance between the brothers is played out in five rounds. The repairing of their relationship is dramatized because they grew up communicating through violence. What Tommy ultimately needs is to hear is, ‘I am sorry.’
 
“Tommy has so much strength of will but once his brother starts choking him and then says ‘I am sorry, I love you”, these words allow him to let go and surrender.”
 
I believe that our inner struggles with God can be extremely intense; even in the Scriptures Jacob and his brother are estranged for fourteen years and Jacob wrestles with an angel (Genesis 32:23), that some say represented Esau. The yoke was broken from Tommy’s neck, like Esau threw Jacob’s from his.
 
Jacob and Esau’s relationship with each other and their father Isaac seem like a template for “Warrior”.
 
However violent the Bible can be, I still don’t think it’s as ruthless as Mixed Martial Arts. Is MMA a way for God to get Tommy’s attention because he is so headstrong? I will let you decide.


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Wolfgang of Regensburg: Wolfgang was born in Swabia, Germany, and was educated at a school located at the abbey of Reichenau. There he encountered Henry, a young noble who went on to become Archbishop of Trier. Meanwhile, Wolfgang remained in close contact with the archbishop, teaching in his cathedral school and supporting his efforts to reform the clergy. 
<p>At the death of the archbishop, Wolfgang chose to become a Benedictine monk and moved to an abbey in Einsiedeln, now part of Switzerland. Ordained a priest, he was appointed director of the monastery school there. Later he was sent to Hungary as a missionary, though his zeal and good will yielded limited results. </p><p>Emperor Otto II appointed him Bishop of Regensburg near Munich. He immediately initiated reform of the clergy and of religious life, preaching with vigor and effectiveness and always demonstrating special concern for the poor. He wore the habit of a monk and lived an austere life. </p><p>The draw to monastic life never left him, including the desire for a life of solitude. At one point he left his diocese so that he could devote himself to prayer, but his responsibilities as bishop called him back. </p><p>In 994 Wolfgang became ill while on a journey; he died in Puppingen near Linz, Austria. He was canonized in 1052. His feast day is celebrated widely in much of central Europe. </p> American Catholic Blog Keep your gaze always on our most beloved Jesus, asking him in the depths of his heart what he desires for you, and never deny him anything even if it means going strongly against the grain for you. –Blessed Maria Sagrario of St. Aloysius Gonzaga

 
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